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I'm the co-host of THIS IS ROCK 'N' ROLL RADIO with Dana & Carl (Sunday nights, 9 to Midnight Eastern, www.westcottradio.org).  As a freelance writer, I contributed to Goldmine magazine from 1986-2006, wrote liner notes for Rhino Records' compilation CD Poptopia!  Power Pop Classics Of The '90s, and for releases by The Flashcubes, The Finkers, Screen Test, 1.4.5., and Jack "Penetrator" Lipton.  I contributed to the books Bubblegum Music Is The Naked Truth, Shake Some Action, Lost In The Grooves, and MusicHound Rock, and to DISCoveries, Amazing Heroes, The Comics Buyer's Guide, Yeah Yeah Yeah, Comics Collector, The Buffalo News, and The Syracuse New Times.  I also wrote the liner notes for the four THIS IS ROCK 'N' ROLL RADIO compilation CDs, because, well, who could stop me?  My standing offer to write liner notes for a Bay City Rollers compilation has remained criminally ignored.  Still intend to write and sell a Batman story someday.

Thursday, March 2, 2017

THE EVERLASTING FIRST, Part 11a: My First Exposures To Some Singers And Superheroes


Continuing a look back at my first exposure to a number of rock 'n' roll acts and superheroes (or other denizens of print or periodical publication), some of which were passing fancies, and some of which I went on to kinda like. They say you never forget your first time; that may be true, but it's the subsequent visits--the second time, the fourth time, the twentieth time, the hundredth time--that define our relationships with the things we cherish. Ultimately, the first meeting is less important than what comes after that. But every love story still needs to begin with that first kiss.

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TODAY'S LETTER IS K




KID ETERNITY

A young boy with access to amazing power, power that's his to command whenever he utters one magic word: ETERNITY!

You were expecting "Shazam?"

In 1971, I hadn't yet read my first Captain Marvel story. Before I discovered the original Captain Marvel, I discovered Kid Eternity.



In a previous post about DC 100-Page Super Spectaculars, I mentioned first seeing Kid Eternity in the pages of the seventh Super Spectacular, aka Superman # 245. I had never even heard of this character before, but I was taken with the concept: a young boy is killed by Nazis in World War II, but when he arrives at the pearly gates, he is denied entrance into Heaven. He was a good kid, so the problem wasn't that his immortal soul was supposed to be shipped south to the pits of damnation; no, he wasn't supposed to be dead at all. It was a clerical error! The Kid--I don't think we ever learned his name in the original '40s comics--was originally destined to live a long life. Goddamned Nazis! They ruin everything!

Well, Heaven prides itself on its efficiency, so such a serious error could not be allowed to stand. To compensate, the kid would be allowed to return to Earth at will, but with powers and abilities far beyond those of mortal men. He couldn't change the course of mighty rivers, nor bend steel in his bare hands, but he could fly, and he could become intangible. And, merely by speaking the word Eternity!, the kid could summon figures from history and literature to help him fight for justice in an unjust world. With the angel Mr. Keeper (or "Keep") at his side, the boy became Kid Eternity.

I didn't read Kid Eternity's full back story until 1973, when the character's first appearance (from 1942's Hit Comics # 25) was reprinted in Secret Origins # 4. The Kid Eternity story in this Superman Super Spec (taken from Kid Eternity # 3 in 1946) gave but a thumbnail view of Kid Eternity's genesis, and then jumped right into the action.



Listen: if you're a champion of justice, and Rembrandt himself pleads for you to take his case, you take his case. Kid 'n' Keep intervened to prevent the theft of The Night Watch. Realizing he needed a little help with these miscreants, Kid Eternity called upon the services of Inspector Javert from Les Miserables, and hijinks ensued.




Nasty fellow, that Javert. And a fat lotta help Nostradamus was. Let's see how the rest of the adventure turned out:





Awrighty. Kid Cafarelli was hooked. Great concept, gorgeous Mac Raboy artwork, and rousin' Golden Age comics fun. Kid Eternity became an instant favorite of mine.




I next caught up with Kid Eternity the following Spring, in the twelfth Super Spectacular (Superboy # 185), possibly a coverless copy. After the Super Specs were cancelled at the end of '72, the Kid popped up in the fourth issue of Wanted: The World's Most Dangerous Villains, one of a passel of regular-sized reprint titles DC threw on the stands in this time frame. I loved the lead story of the Golden Age Green Lantern's first tussle with Solomon Grundy, I adored the tale of Kid Eternity's first meeting with his evil opposite number Master Man, but I was really and truly blown away by a DC house ad that appeared in that issue:



My fondness for kids with magic words that granted them super powers was about to really take off.




As noted, the Kid's origin story was reprinted in Secret Origins # 4. When the Super Specs returned in 1973, Kid Eternity found his way into the 21st and final issue of that series, another collection of young hero adventures toplined by Superboy. The Super Spec format was then adopted by a number of ongoing DC titles; I'm not sure how many more Kid Eternity reprints appeared, but I know there was one in the awesome Detective Comics # 439, a comic which featured a new Batman tale called "Night Of The Stalker!" (still my all-time favorite Batman story).

In spite of Kid Eternity's impressive presence in DC reprints, there was no attempt to revisit the character in new stories. When the annual epic Justice League/Justice Society team-up in 1973 revived a bunch of characters from Quality Comics, the 1940s publisher from whom DC had purchased Kid Eternity, Plastic Man, and Blackhawk, among many others, Kid Eternity was not among the heroic freedom fighters assembled in those pages.

Kid Eternity's return would have to wait until the early '80s. Writer E. Nelson Bridwell was obviously fond of our Kid; after all, Bridwell had been the DC staffer in charge of selecting reprints for the Super Specs, Wanted, and Secret Origins, and ENB had certainly demonstrated a fondness for reprising Kid Eternity's Golden Age exploits in those pages. In 1982, Bridwell was chronicling the new adventures of Captain Marvel in the Shazam! strip, which appeared in World's Finest Comics. In WFC # 278, an unseen benefactor rescued The Marvel Family from a dire predicament; in the following issues, we learned that benefactor was Kid Eternity, and we learned of his heretofore-unknown connection to the Marvels:



Well...of course! The revelation that Kid Eternity was Captain Marvel Junior's long-lost brother made sense, and it linked the two grand magic-word heroes of the Golden Age in fitting fashion. Kid Eternity continued to appear in Shazam! until the strip ended in Adventure Comics # 492.

I don't think the original Kid Eternity ever appeared again after that. The name and general concept were revived for an edgy series in DC's Vertigo line, and it was so far away from the charm of the Kid Eternity I loved that I never even read anything past its debut issue.

But if I never had any use for dark 'n' gritty re-imaginings of Kid Eternity, I've never let go of my fondness for the original. How long should you expect me to retain my love of this character?

Duh.

ETERNITY!




Quick Takes For K:

KA-ZAR



Hmmm. Marvel's jungle-hero Tarzan knock-off first appeared in Marvel Comics # 1 in 1939, but dates back even farther to pre-comics pulp magazines. I probably saw Ka-Zar in an issue of X-Men some time in the '60s...I guess?  I definitely remember seeing ol' Ka-Zar's first Silver Age solo appearance in Marvel Super-Heroes # 19 in 1969. I had a coverless copy of that--which is a damned shame, because Jack Kirby's stunning cover would turn out to be my favorite part!

KID COLT, OUTLAW



No idea, I'm afraid. I went through a period where I was soakin' up reprints of Marvel's cowboy gunfighter heroes--The Rawhide Kid, The Two-Gun Kid, and Kid Colt, Outlaw--with a ferocious appreciation nearly the equal of my rabid devotion to superheroes. But I have no recollection of where I started.

KRAZY KAT



My first exposure to George Herriman's classic characters Krazy Kat, Ignatz Mouse, and Offisa Pupp came not via comic strips, but in TV reruns of the Krazy Kat cartoons. The cartoons were included in The Little Rascals TV package, which mixed Our Gang shorts with cartoons starring Krazy Kat, Snuffy Smith, and a host of other once-popular characters slipping out of the pop public consciousness in the late '60s and very early '70s.



WHEN THE EVERLASTING FIRST RETURNS: K continues with





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