Sunday, February 28, 2021

Tonight On THIS IS ROCK 'N' ROLL RADIO

It's TIRnRR # 1066! Man, you'd think we'd commemorate that number by somehow tying the show to the Battle of Hastings, or at least by playing Norman's Normans. But no! Like a Bizarro Edward the Confessor (or maybe Sam Cooke), we must admit we don't know much about history. We're too busy with NEW music from The Permanent Green Light, D.W. Dunphy, Brian Bringelson, and Chris Church, a new/old single from America's Sweetheart Irene Peña, a new archival set from The Sails, and a dazzling array of rockin' pop past 'n' present, encompassing the sounds of Jackie Wilson, The Beatles, Bow Wow Wow, The Ramones, Wanda Jackson, Stevie Wonder, The Muffs, Kid Gulliver, Dolph Chaney, The Kinks, Joan Armatrading, The Legal Matters, The Monkees, Holly Golightly, and more. And we begin the show by celebrating a birthday. Keep your Harold II and your William the Conqueror; neither of 'em could play guitar worth a damn anyway. This battle will be fought with music. Surrender. Sunday night, 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FMhttp://sparksyracuse.org/

Saturday, February 27, 2021

POP-A-LOOZA: SHAZAM! My Secret Origin As A Captain Marvel Fan

Each week, the pop culture website Pop-A-Looza shares some posts from my vast 'n' captivating Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do) archives. The latest shared post is my look back at becoming a fan of the original Captain Marvel: "SHAZAM! My Secret Origin As A Captain Marvel Fan."

Since this piece was first published in 2016, the original Captain Marvel made his feature film debut in Shazam! (2019), a picture which did nothing but disappoint me. I knew going in that it wouldn't be my Captain Marvel, the World's Mightiest Mortal, and that the character wouldn't even be called "Captain Marvel," the folks at DC Comics having already conceded that rival Marvel Comics owns that name by now. I tried to adjust my expectations and enjoy the movie for its stated intent to be Big with superheroes. I was succeeding in that effort until a brutally violent scene with the evil Dr. Sivana created an ugly juxtaposition of dark-n-gritty clashing with what had been a lighthearted movie up until that point. Not fish, not fowl. After that scene, I couldn't regain my interest in the movie. I may try to watch it again, but the first viewing turned me off.

(And, for the record, I do like actress Brie Larson as Marvel's Captain Marvel, an entirely different character that shares only a name with our classic Cap. Not even the World's Mightiest Mortal can overcome the setback of a lapsed copyright, so I don't hold that against the Marvel movies. I just wish a Shazam! movie could capture my fancy; I'll try to give the forthcoming Black Adam and Shazam! Fury Of The Gods flicks a fair shot at righting the Shazam! franchise's wrongs.)

A near-future shared post will speak a little bit about what I would prefer to see in a new Captain Marvel adventure, whether on the page or on the screen. For now, my story of discovering the original Captain Marvel is the latest Boppin' Pop-A-Looza.

TIP THE BLOGGER: CC's Tip Jar!

You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Hey! If you buy from Amazon, consider making your purchases through links at Pop-A-Looza. A portion of your purchase there will go to support Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do). Thinking Amazon? Think Pop-A-Looza.

This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl airs Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read about our history here.

The many fine This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio compilation albums are still available, each full of that rockin' pop sound you crave. A portion of all sales benefit our perpetually cash-strapped community radio project:


Volume 1: download

Volume 2: CD or download
Volume 3: download
Volume 4: CD or download
Waterloo Sunset--Benefit For This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio:  CD or download

Carl's writin' a book! The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1)will contain 165 essays about 165 tracks, each one of 'em THE greatest record ever made. An infinite number of records can each be the greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. Updated initial information can be seen here: THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE! (Volume 1). My weekly Greatest Record Ever Made! video rants can be seen in my GREM! YouTube playlist. And I'm on Twitter @CafarelliCarl.

Friday, February 26, 2021

On Twitter @CafarelliCarl

Kathryn Hahn, Gene Simmons, Squeeze, Sugar Snow, The Hollies, The Four Tops, and The Flashcubes (covering The Monkees).The morning commute, driven by iPod.

BOPPIN's Monthly Day Off: THE EASYBEATS

Once a month, Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do) takes a brief break from its numbskull commitment to daily public posting and delivers something intended only for its paid supporters. This month's private post for patrons is another chapter from my book in progress The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1), this time celebrating "Friday On My Mind" by Australian pop gods The Easybeats.

Patrons will receive that Easybeats post on Monday, but with Monday's public blogging already reserved for this week's This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio playlist, it makes sense to take that break today, Regular daily public posting will resume tomorrow. You can become a supporter of this blog for a mere $2 a month: Fund me, baby!

Thursday, February 25, 2021

MY WEEKLY VIDEO BLOG: THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE! # 19: The Monkees, "The Girl I Knew Somewhere"

An infinite number of songs can each be THE greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. I like that idea so much I'm writing a book about it. And I'm promoting that book with a weekly video series, discussing each of the book's chosen tracks one by one.

I felt like it was time to skip around in the book's Table Of Contents, so this week's video rant jumps ahead to The Monkees and "The Girl I Knew Somewhere." This Michael Nesmith tune was the B-side of The Monkees' 1967 # 2 single "A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You," but it also made the Top 40 as well, and it was featured on the TV series. Here's the song, and here's my rant:

"The Girl I Knew Somewhere" is one of two Monkees songs tentatively scheduled for discussion in the GREM! book. The other Monkees song in the book is "Porpoise Song (Theme From Head)," and if I decide to narrow the discussion to just one Monkees track, then "Porpoise Song" will stay and "The Girl I Knew Somewhere" will go. For now, they're both in the book until I decree otherwise. As noted in the video rant, no less a Monkees authority than Micky Dolenz once shared my original "Girl I Knew Somewhere" on his own Facebook page, so, y'know, hey-hey! That's a strong argument in favor of using both songs. We'll see.

If you dig whatever the hell it is I'm doing in these weekly videos, please subscribe to my YouTube channelNEXT WEEK: we'll jump off that bridge when we get to it. Hmmm...that may sound like a tease for "Porpoise Song," but it's not. In the mean time, I thank you for joining me for this week's video in The Greatest Record Ever Made!

THIS WEEK'S VIDEO: The Monkees, "The Girl I Knew Somewhere"

GREM! # 18: Melanie with the Edwin Hawking Singers, "Lay Down (Candles In The Rain)"

GREM! # 17: The Romantics, "What I Like About You"

GREM! # 16: The Hollies, "I Can't Let Go"

GREM! # 14: Crazy Elephant, "Gimme Gimme Good Lovin'"

GREM! # 13: Neil Diamond, "Brother Love's Traveling Salvation Show"

GREM! # 12: Little Richard, "The Girl Can't Help It"

GREM! # 11: Eytan Mirsky, "This Year's Gonna Be Our Year"

GREM! # 10: The Monkees, "Riu Chiu"

GREM! # 9: Patti Smith, "Gloria"

GREM! # 8: Big Mama Thornton, "Hound Dog"

GREM! # 7: Elvis Presley, "Heartbreak Hotel"

GREM! # 6The Sex Pistols,"God Save The Queen"

GREM! # 5: Dusty Springfield,"I Only Want To Be With You"

GREM! # 4: Chuck Berry, "Promised Land"

GREM! # 3: Baron Daemon and the Vampires, "The TransylvaniaTwist"

GREM! # 2: Badfinger, "Baby Blue"

GREM! # 1: The Ramones, "Do You Remember Rock 'n' Roll Radio?

TIP THE BLOGGER: CC's Tip Jar!

You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Hey! If you buy from Amazon, consider making your purchases through links at Pop-A-Looza. A portion of your purchase there will go to support Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do). Thinking Amazon? Think Pop-A-Looza.

This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl airs Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read about our history here.

The many fine This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio compilation albums are still available, each full of that rockin' pop sound you crave. A portion of all sales benefit our perpetually cash-strapped community radio project:


Volume 1: download

Volume 2: CD or download
Volume 3: download
Volume 4: CD or download
Waterloo Sunset--Benefit For This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio:  CD or download

Carl's writin' a book! The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1)will contain 165 essays about 165 tracks, each one of 'em THE greatest record ever made. An infinite number of records can each be the greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. Updated initial information can be seen here: THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE! (Volume 1). My weekly Greatest Record Ever Made! video rants can be seen in my GREM! YouTube playlist. And I'm on Twitter @CafarelliCarl.

Wednesday, February 24, 2021

POP-A-LOOZA! He Buys Every Rock 'n' Roll Book On The Magazine Stands, Part 2: Phonograph Record Magazine

Each week, the pop culture website Pop-A-Looza shares some posts from my vast 'n' captivating Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do) archives. The latest shared post is the second installment of my rock magazine reminiscence He Buys Every Rock 'n' Roll Book On The Magazine Stands, this time spotlighting Phonograph Record Magazine.

I cannot overstate the importance of Phonograph Record Magazine in my development as a rockin' pop fan. I was 17 when I first read PRM in 1977. I was already deeply into the sounds of the previous decade, especially The Beatles and the British Invasion. I had already seen my first rock concert, KISS with Uriah Heep. I was listening to the radio, AM and FM, buying as many records as I could afford, new and used. I was beginning to read rock 'n' roll histories. I was becoming a serious rock and pop fan, at least to the extent that I could be serious about anything. Clearly, music mattered to me, and that interest was only going to intensify, with or without PRM.

Phonograph Record Magazine introduced me to punk. Everything--everything--that followed for me was influenced by that flashpoint.

How different would my path have been without PRM? It's impossible to say. I'm sure I would have been exposed to much of this stuff eventually...but timing, man. I was 17, a high-school square peg, looking for something extraordinary. A tabloid rock rag provided access. 1-2-3-4. Hey ho, let's GO!

This blog is littered with examples of PRM's influence. The Ramones. The Sex Pistols. Patti Smith. Elvis Costello. The Damned. Cheap Trick. The evolution of the music I loved the most, album by album and song by song. My first attempt at rock journalism. The Flashcubes. The Flashcubes and The Ramones and The Runaways. Writing professionally about pop music. I owe a lot of this--maybe all of this--to the flame sparked by Phonograph Record Magazine when I was 17.

Read all about it. My memory of Phonograph Record Magazine provides the latest Boppin' Pop-A-Looza.

TIP THE BLOGGER: CC's Tip Jar!

You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Hey! If you buy from Amazon, consider making your purchases through links at Pop-A-Looza. A portion of your purchase there will go to support Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do). Thinking Amazon? Think Pop-A-Looza.


This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl airs Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read about our history here.


The many fine This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio compilation albums are still available, each full of that rockin' pop sound you crave. A portion of all sales benefit our perpetually cash-strapped community radio project:


Volume 1: download

Volume 2: CD or download
Volume 3: download
Volume 4: CD or download
Waterloo Sunset--Benefit For This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio:  CD or download

Carl's writin' a book! The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1)will contain 165 essays about 165 tracks, each one of 'em THE greatest record ever made. An infinite number of records can each be the greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. Updated initial information can be seen here: THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE! (Volume 1). My weekly Greatest Record Ever Made! video rants can be seen in my GREM! YouTube playlist. And I'm on Twitter @CafarelliCarl


Tuesday, February 23, 2021

10 SONGS: 2/23/2021

10 Songs is a weekly list of ten songs that happen to be on my mind at the moment. Given my intention to usually write these on Mondays, the lists are often dominated by songs played on the previous night's edition of This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl. The idea was inspired by Don Valentine of the essential blog I Don't Hear A Single.

This week's edition of 10 Songs draws exclusively from the playlist for This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio # 1065.

JOAN ARMATRADING: Eating The Bear

"Eating The Bear" was (I think) the first Joan Armatrading track I knew, a cut from her 1981 album Walk Under Ladders. It's not the best-known track on that record; both "I'm Lucky" and "When I Get It Right" wound up on her subsequent Greatest Hits collection, while "Eating The Bear" remained native to the original album only. I was exposed to all three of those tracks in the same time frame, so I can't say for sure which one I heard first. But, whichever one was first to cross into my sovereign airspace, "Eating The Bear" was the one that had impact. Its impact came via the radio. Of course.

In 1981, I was a recent college graduate (State University College at Brockport Class of 1980), living in an apartment with my girlfriend (who was still completing her undergrad studies at Brockport), working at McDonald's, drinking beer, listening to my music. Brockport is a small village on the Erie Canal. It's located in Western New York, about 19 miles west of Rochester, and the city of Buffalo sprawls another 64 miles or so farther away. We could usually get radio stations from Buffalo and even from Toronto. Buffalo had a generic album-rock station called 97 Rock, which usually wasn't of much interest to me. Sunday nights were the exception. That's when this cookie-cutter rock station transformed itself temporarily into something greater: a weekly showcase called 97 Power Rock.

97 Power Rock claimed a more adventurous format, programming new wave rock and other fare that was presumably edgier than the station's prerequisite diet of Loverboy and Ozzy Osborne. 97 Power Rock played the likes of The Teardrop Explodes, U2, Psychedelic Furs, Viva Beat, Joy Division, Spandau Ballet, The Vibrators, Mission of Burma, old school rock by Andy Fairweather Low, even reggae by Dillinger. It was sufficiently eclectic and vibrant to secure my loyalty.

Joan Armatrading's music was part of that. Walk Under Ladders had a little bit of a post-punk vibe, partially attributable to Thomas Dolby's synthesizer work on the album. That perceived level of cool opened 97 Power Rock's playlist for entry, and Armatrading's own songs, singing, playing, and pure presence did the rest. Man, this sounded fantastic on the radio. It didn't quite move me to buy the album--I was still a few years away from grasping Armatrading's brilliance--but it got my attention. I heard the songs, and a radio ad for the album, all of which prompted me to scrawl Walk Under Ladders in my spiral notebook, on the long, long list of LPs I wanted to buy once I'd accumulated enough burger-flippin' cash to buy all of the albums I wanted.

"Eating The Bear" was the Armatrading track for me. In 1981, I'd never heard the phrase Some days you eat the bear, some days the bear eats you, so I had no idea whatsoever of the song's subject matter. I just thought it sounded great, and it still sounds great. 

For years, Armatrading's Greatest Hits was her sole representation in my music collection, and "Me Myself I" is slated to be discussed in my book The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1). "Eating The Bear" popped into my head again recently, and I snagged a CD of Walk Under Ladders, a wonderful album that I wish had made the transition from my notebook list to my record shelf forty years ago. Better late than never. We played "I Wanna Hold You" on last week's show, "Eating The Bear" this week, and another Walk Under Ladders track will appear on next week's playlist. TIRnRR Power Rock. Sometimes it takes a while, but radio gets the job done eventually.

SAM COOKE: Bring It On Home To Me

When I was an oldies-obsessed college student in the late '70s, there was one time when I sang an impromptu duet with a woman working at the campus snack bar, me doing most of the warbling on a snippet of Sam Cooke's "Bring It On Home To Me." She was surprised someone so young was familiar with the song to begin with, but, y'know, see above reference to oldies-obsessed. Truth to tell, I mostly knew the song from The Animals' cover version, but I knew Cooke's original, too. It wasn't until a couple of weeks ago that I learned the secondary vocal on Cooke's recording was performed by a then-unknown Lou Rawls. You'll never find (dum dum dumdee dum) another secondary vocal like his (dum dum dumdee dum). Bring it on home, Lou.

CROSBY, STILLS AND NASH: Marrakesh Express

I've spent many years publicly grousing that Crosby, Stills and Nash broke up three superb groups--The Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, and The Hollies--to make one okay group. That joke's run its course (which, of course, won't stop me from still resorting to it at whim). I loved CSN when I was young, and I frequently listened to my sister's copy of their debut album. Actually, because I've always been more of a single-song guy rather than an album guy, I listened to "Marrakesh Express" and "Suite: Judy Blue Eyes." The latter is/was my pick, but my short-attention span for radio playlists favors the former.  

THE GO-GO'S: La La Land

The Go-Go's have been eligible for induction into The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame for many years, but they are at long last first-time nominees in 2021. It's about damned time, and I hope they get in on the first ballot. "La La Land" comes from the group's 2001 album God Bless The Go-Go's, and it remains one of my fave raves among their cavalcade o' wonder.

THE LEGAL MATTERS: Light Up The Sky

This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio's long 'n' harmonious history with The Legal Matters was detailed here, as part of the expanded supplemental liner notes to our 2017 compilation This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio, Volume 4. So! Word of a brand-new Legal Matters album perked up our ears and mandated a playlist spot for its advance single, "Light Up The Sky." The album, Chapter Three, is due from Futureman Records on April 30th, and it is a compulsory purchase for any breathing fan of rockin' pop music. Don't argue. Do what radio tells you to do. 

JUICE NEWTON: Queen Of Hearts

During that same early '80s period when I was listening to 97 Power Rock, I was also occasionally tuned to AM Top 40. That format had provided the soundtrack of my formative years, and even into the early '80s I held tightly to a naive conviction that cool 'n' compelling pop sounds could one day reclaim the AM radio dial. That stubborn faith had no foundation in the plausible, but I clung to the belief with great determination.. 

Juice Newton's "Queen Of Hearts" was the best thing on AM Top 40 in 1981, and its # 2 Billboard chart ascendancy gave temporary credence to my misguided dream of what AM pop could become again. I didn't really know anything about the song--that it had been written by Hank DeVito (pedal steel guitarist for Emmylou Harris), nor that it had first been recorded by Dave Edmunds. I just knew a transcendent AM pop record when I heard it. And as big an Edmunds fan as I am, I still regard Juice Newton's take as the definitive version of "Queen Of Hearts."

KEN SHARP: Hold Me, Touch Me

True pop believer Ken Sharp is a huge fan of KISS, and it's a little surprising that (as far as I can recall) he hasn't released any KISS covers before this new single. As befits a true pop believer, Ken's choice of KISS inspirations draws not from a "Shout It Out Loud" or a "Calling Dr. Love," nor from any of KISS's group releases. Instead, Ken goes to the solo albums, the four LPs released simultaneously in 1978 by each member of the group. Specifically, Ken goes to two of those solo albums--sorry, Ace Frehley and Peter Criss!--and revamps a track apiece from Paul Stanley and Gene Simmons, with Paul's "Hold Me, Thrill Me" on the virtual A-side and Gene's "Mr. Make Believe" as its digital flip. You wanted the best? You got the best.

GENE SIMMONS: See You Tonight

Speaking of those KISS solo albums, my pick of the lot is this uncharacteristically tender pop ballad from Simmons. Although I was a KISS fan myself, I didn't buy any of the solo albums at the time, opting only to pick up Ace Frehley's hit 45 of "New York Groove" contemporary to the releases. When I decided to write a history of KISS for Goldmine magazine in the late '80s, I tried to fill in some of the gaps in my KISS collection. The Gene Simmons record was not among my acquisitions in that search-and-secure action. I did grab a Best Of The Solo Albums collection, and that had to suffice for the time being.

Best Of The Solo Albums did not include "See You Tonight." I didn't even hear that song until KISS performed an acoustic version in their 1995 TV appearance on MTV Unplugged. I say thee WOW! It immediately reminded me of Big Star, and I picked up both the MTV Unplugged and Gene Simmons CDs at my first opportunity thereafter.

THE TARTAN HORDE: Rollers Show

KISS, Juice Newton. By now, it should be clear that I'm unashamedly into the sounds I'm into, and that would certainly include the music of The Bay City Rollers. In 1977 and '78, the idea that my burgeoning love of punk and power pop could also encompass the Rollers led me to take Nick Lowe's "Rollers Show" at face value. It's a tribute! Nick's a Rollers fan like I'm a Rollers fan!

Years later, I would discover that Lowe wrote a song called "Bay City Rollers, We Love You Show" as a contract-breaker, a tune so deliberately bad that its submission would allow Lowe to free himself from a songwriting commitment with United Artists, a bond he wanted to escape as quickly as possible. Lowe was appalled when UA loved the damned thing, and issued it as a single, credited to the non-existent combo The Tartan Horde. The original single had an instrumental as its B-side; some subsequent release paired it with "Rollers Show," which was an absolutely beguiling pastiche of the Rollers. "Rollers Show" also turned up on Pure Pop For Now People, the American version of Lowe's debut album Jesus Of Cool.

And I still take it at face value. Pure pop, pure magic, its author's intent notwithstanding. Bay City Rollers, we love you.

TRACEY ULLMAN: Breakaway



I moved from Brockport to Buffalo in August of 1982. The two years spent in Brockport after graduation had been...well, they certainly had been. Maybe I'll write about all of that some day. I kept on listening to the radio, AM and FM. At the beginning of '83, a new job required my own set of wheels, so my Dad arranged for me to get the 1969 Chevy Impala that had previously belonged to my grandfather. My first car. My first opportunity to drive with the radio on.

In the Impala, I was sometimes able to pick up a great AM hit station out of Toronto. More often, the Impala's AM dial was locked on 14 Rock, a former Christian station that had recently converted to a pop format. It was my last gasp of trying to listen to AM Top 40, and it had its moments. 

Tracey Ullman's "They Don't Know" was one of the finer moments. I was not familiar with Kirsty MacColl's original British single, nor could I even figure out initially who was responsible for this splendid, irresistible confection emanating from my car's speakers; note to DJs then and now: if you play it, SAY IT! Jeez, how can radio do its job of selling records if we don't know the names of the records playing?

I eventually ID'd the singer and the song. Tracey Ullman became far better known as an actress and comic performer, but she made her mark in music, too. She's considered a one-hit wonder in America, but her British hit cover of Irma Thomas's "Breakaway" shoulda been a smash on these shores as well. Wish I coulda heard that on the radio, too.

(And if Tracey Ullman's "They Don't Know" really was my final big AM Top 40 song, then I went out in style. Radio up. Windows down. Let's hit the road and drive.)

TIP THE BLOGGER: CC's Tip Jar!

You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Hey! If you buy from Amazon, consider making your purchases through links at Pop-A-Looza. A portion of your purchase there will go to support Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do). Thinking Amazon? Think Pop-A-Looza.


This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl airs Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read about our history here.


The many fine This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio compilation albums are still available, each full of that rockin' pop sound you crave. A portion of all sales benefit our perpetually cash-strapped community radio project:


Volume 1: download

Volume 2: CD or download
Volume 3: download
Volume 4: CD or download
Waterloo Sunset--Benefit For This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio:  CD or download

Carl's writin' a book! The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1)will contain 165 essays about 165 tracks, each one of 'em THE greatest record ever made. An infinite number of records can each be the greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. Updated initial information can be seen here: THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE! (Volume 1). My weekly Greatest Record Ever Made! video rants can be seen in my GREM! YouTube playlist. And I'm on Twitter @CafarelliCarl

Monday, February 22, 2021

This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio # 1065

The basic mechanics of programming a killer rockin' pop radio show require the same nuts and bolts one would use to slap together an ultimate mix tape. You want proper flow. You want dynamics. You want pizazz and verve, hits and obscurities, familiar favorites and the pleasant jolt of the unexpected. And you've gotta start with that perfect opening track.

Sometimes your opening track should be something new. Sometimes it should be something classic. This week on This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio, something from the house band seemed in order. The Kinks. It had to be The Kinks. And something else: it had to be The Kinks performing The Greatest Record Ever Made, "Waterloo Sunset."

An infinite number of songs can each be the greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. To start this show off right, it was "Waterloo Sunset"'s turn. With that perfect opener, the rest of the playlist fell into place. New. Old. Killer. Essential mix tape accomplished. There is science to this magic, magic to this science. Understanding the mechanics sparks the alchemy we need. This is what rock 'n' roll radio sounded like on a Sunday night in Syracuse this week.

This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl airs Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read all about this show's long and weird history here: Boppin' The Whole Friggin' Planet (The History Of THIS IS ROCK 'N' ROLL RADIO). TAX DEDUCTIBLE DONATIONS are always welcome.

The many fine This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio compilation albums are still available, each full of that rockin' pop sound you crave. A portion of all sales benefit our perpetually cash-strapped community radio project:

Volume 1: download
Volume 2: CD or download
Volume 3: download
Volume 4: CD or download
Waterloo Sunset--Benefit For This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio:  CD or download

PS: SEND MONEY!!!! We need tech upgrades like Elvis needs boats. Spark Syracuse is supported by listeners like you. Tax-deductible donations are welcome at
http://sparksyracuse.org/support/

You can follow Carl's daily blog Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do) at 
https://carlcafarelli.blogspot.com/

Hey, Carl's writin' a book! The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1) will contain 165 essays about 165 songs, each one of 'em THE greatest record ever made. An infinite number of songs can each be the greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. Updated initial information can be seen here, and you can see my weekly GREM! video rants in my Greatest Record Ever Made! YouTube playlist. 

TIRnRR # 1065: 2/21/2021
TIRnRR FRESH SPINS! Tracks we think we ain't played before are listed in bold

THE RAMONES: Do You Remember Rock 'n' Roll Radio? (Rhino, End Of The Century)
--
THE KINKS: Waterloo Sunset (Essential, Something Else)
THE TARTAN HORDE: Rollers Show (Yep Roc, NICK LOWE: Jesus Of Cool)
THE BAY CITY ROLLERS: Saturday Night (Arista, The Definitive Collection)
THE ROMANTICS: When I Look In Your Eyes (Nemperor, The Romantics)
JUICE NEWTON: Queen Of Hearts (Capitol, Greatest Hits [And More])
NICK LOWE: Heart Of The City [live] (Yep Roc, Jesus Of Cool)
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THE LEGAL MATTERS: Light Up The Sky (Futureman, Chapter Three)
THE YACHTS: I Can't Stay Long (Cherry Red, Suffice To Say)
SAM COOKE: Bring It On Home To Me (Abkco, Portrait Of A Legend)
JACKIE WILSON: I Just Can't Help It (SRI, The Legendary Jackie Wilson)
THE GOLD NEEDLES: If I Needed Someone (Jem, What's Tomorrow Ever Done For You?)
THE BYRDS: The Bells Of Rhymney (Columbia, Mr. Tambourine Man)
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KEN SHARP: Hold Me, Touch Me (single)
THE JAM: Beat Surrender (Polydor, Direction Reaction Creation)
KELLEY RYAN: The Church Of Laundry (single)
HARMONIC DIRT: What Did You Take? (harmonicdirt.com, Rhode Island Street)
GENE SIMMONS: See You Tonight (Mercury, KISS: Gene Simmons)
THE SAINTS: Demolition Girl (Amsterdamned, [I'm] Stranded)
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BLAINE CAMPBELL & THE CALIFORNIA SOUND: While You Sit At Home And Cry (single)
THE BEACH BOYS: Don't Worry Baby (Capitol, Good Vibrations)
BOW WOW WOW: Louis Quatorze (Cherry Red, Your Box Set Pet)
X-RAY SPEX: Germ Free Adolescents (Sanctuary, Germfree Adolescents)
JOAN ARMATRADING: Eating The Bear (A & M, Walk Under Ladders)
THE WHITE STRIPES: The Hardest Button To Button (Legacy, Greatest Hits)
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THE CERAMIC AGE: Magenta Moon (Big Stir, single)
DR. FEELGOOD: Roxette (Rhino, I'm A Man)
CROSBY, STILLS & NASH: Marrakesh Express (Rhino, Greatest Hits)
STACK WADDY: Nadine (Cherry Red, Stack Waddy)
LINDA RONSTADT: How Do I Make You (Rhino, Greatest Hits I & II)
HOLLY GOLIGHTLY: Sally Go Round The Roses (Damaged Goods, My First Holly Golightly Album)
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RICH CHAMBERS: I'm So Tired (single)
NORMAN'S NORMANS: 9-9-9! (n/a, Music From Ripped!)
POP CO-OP: Catching Light (Futureman, Factory Settings)
BASH & POP: Anything Could Happen (Fat Possum, Anything Could Happen)
THE MONKEES: You Just May Be The One (Rhino, Headquarters)
THE REPLACEMENTS: Left Of The Dial (Sire, Tim)
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KID GULLIVER: Beauty School Dropout (Red On Red, single)
THE PRETENDERS: Stop Your Sobbing (Sire, The Singles)
JOAN JETT & THE BLACKHEARTS: Eye To Eye (Blackheart, Pure And Simple)
SQUEEZE: Another Nail In My Heart (A & M, The Squeeze Story)
STEVIE WONDER: Signed, Sealed, Delivered I'm Yours (Motown, The Definitive Collection)
MATTHEW SWEET & SUSANNA HOFFS: You're My Favorite Waste Of Time (Shout Factory, Under The Covers Vol. 1)
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THE FLASHCUBES: You Got My Promise (Northside, Flashcubes Forever)
THE OHMS: Chain Letter (Northside, single)
THE RAMONES: Questioningly (Rhino, Road To Ruin)
JOHNNY THUNDERS & THE HEARTBREAKERS: Born To Lose (Jungle, L.A.M.F.)
JOSIE & THE PUSSYCATS: You've Come A Long Way Baby (Rhino Handmade, Stop, Look And Listen!)
THE MODERN LOVERS: Roadrunner (Castle, The Modern Lovers)
DOLPH CHANEY: My Good Twin (Big Stir, This Is Dolph Chaney)
TRACEY ULLMAN: Breakaway (Rhino, You Broke My Heart In 17 Places)
LESLIE ODOM, JR: Good Times (Abkco, VA: One Night In Miami... OST)
XTC: Statue Of Liberty (Virgin, White Music)
THE GO-GO'S: La La Land (Beyond, God Bless The Go-Go's)
THE BEATLES: I'm Happy Just To Dance With You (Apple, A Hard Day's Night)