About Me

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I'm the co-host of THIS IS ROCK 'N' ROLL RADIO with Dana & Carl (Sunday nights, 9 to Midnight Eastern, www.westcottradio.org).  As a freelance writer, I contributed to Goldmine magazine from 1986-2006, wrote liner notes for Rhino Records' compilation CD Poptopia!  Power Pop Classics Of The '90s, and for releases by The Flashcubes, The Finkers, Screen Test, 1.4.5., and Jack "Penetrator" Lipton.  I contributed to the books Bubblegum Music Is The Naked Truth, Shake Some Action, Lost In The Grooves, and MusicHound Rock, and to DISCoveries, Amazing Heroes, The Comics Buyer's Guide, Yeah Yeah Yeah, Comics Collector, The Buffalo News, and The Syracuse New Times.  I also wrote the liner notes for the four THIS IS ROCK 'N' ROLL RADIO compilation CDs, because, well, who could stop me?  My standing offer to write liner notes for a Bay City Rollers compilation has remained criminally ignored.  Still intend to write and sell a Batman story someday.

Monday, December 10, 2018

This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio # 953



Singles Going Steady was my introduction to the music of The Buzzcocks. Although it was really just a compilation of the group's singles, it was the first Buzzcocks album released in America. I bought my copy at Syracuse's Desert Shore Records in 1979, and cherished it from that day forward. "Ever Fallen In Love." "What Do I Get?" "I Don't Mind." "Orgasm Addict." "Love You More." "Everybody's Happy Nowadays." "Harmony In My Head." "Promises." Classics, all of 'em. And that was just Side One!

I'm sure I read about the band before that visit to Desert Shore, but I can't remember whether or not I'd heard any of the records before snapping up my copy of Singles Going Steady. Either way, I knew: mine. My music. My kind of record. My kind of band. Music firmly rooted in the example of the 1960s British Invasion; music that couldn't have existed without British punk making it possible. Mine.

Other than Steve Diggle's "Harmony In My Head," all of those amazing tracks on Side One of Singles Going Steady were written or co-written by Pete Shelley. Shelley and Diggle were inspired by The Sex Pistols, but informed by a working knowledge of hooks and harmonies, the power of pop, the sheer thrill of what a 45 rpm record could do when played loud, when played on the radio. Some called The Buzzcocks the punk Beatles. To me, another touchstone seemed closer to the mark: The Buzzcocks reminded me of The Kinks.

I can't explain exactly why. Maybe it was a vague similarity in the quirky nature of the lead vocals. Maybe it was the shrugging off of any pretense of perfection, the casual embrace of its own ragged glory. For whatever reason: God save The Buzzcocks. Now and always, God save The Buzzcocks.

The Buzzcocks broke up in 1981. Shelley and Diggle reunited in 1989, and their latter-day Buzzcocks accomplished the seemingly impossible: they made new records that were the equal of the old stuff, worthy successors to the nonpareil heights of Singles Going Steady. How many great bands can go away, come back, and still be great? It's uncommon, but it happens. The Buzzcocks were proof of that. Fercryinoutloud, just listen to "Wish I Never Loved You" from the 2006 album Flat Pack Philosophy; it's as great as '78, a single going steady, displaced in time. And, the song's title notwithstanding, it's another reason why I'm glad I love The Buzzcocks.

When we received the news last week of Pete Shelley's sudden passing, we knew we needed to pay some kind of tribute. Ever fallen in love? The pundits said punk wasn't built to last. But the music outlasts us; it will outlive us all. While we're still here, we'll play what's ours. Mine. Yours. Everybody's. Everybody's happy nowadays. We mourn. But we jump up and down, and we sing along with this music that is ours. A thunder of hearts. A harmony in my head. Singles going steady. I believe.  

NEXT WEEK: Our last regular TIRnRR of 2018. IN TWO WEEKS: On December 23rd, it's The 20th Annual This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio Christmas Show. HEY!! This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio turns 21 years old right after the Christmas show. We should maybe oughtta celebrate a little bit. This is what rock 'n' roll radio sounded like on a Sunday night in Syracuse this week.

This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl, Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse on The Spark WSPJ-LP 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/

Spark Syracuse is supported by listeners like you. Tax-deductible donations are welcome at http://sparksyracuse.org/support/


You can follow Carl's daily blog Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do) at 

https://carlcafarelli.blogspot.com/

Our new compilation CD This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio, Volume 4 is now available from Kool Kat Musik! 29 tracks of irresistible rockin' pop, starring Pop Co-OpRay PaulCirce Link & Christian NesmithVegas With Randolph Featuring Lannie FlowersThe SlapbacksP. HuxIrene PeñaMichael Oliver & the Sacred Band Featuring Dave MerrittThe RubinoosStepford KnivesThe Grip WeedsPopdudesRonnie DarkThe FlashcubesChris von SneidernThe Bottle Kids1.4.5.The SmithereensPaul Collins' BeatThe Hit SquadThe RulersThe Legal MattersMaura & the Bright LightsLisa Mychols, and Mr. Encrypto & the Cyphers. You gotta have it, so order it at https://tinyurl.com/ycnly8oz Digital download version (minus The Smithereens' track) now available at 
https://tinyurl.com/ycauy9xt


TIRnRR # 953: 12/9/18


THE RAMONES: Do You Remember Rock 'n' Roll Radio? (Rhino, End Of The Century)

--
THE BUZZCOCKS: What Do I Get? (IRS, Singles Going Steady)
MAGAZINE: A Song From Under The Floorboards (Rhino, VA: Left Of The Dial)
SHIRLEY & COMPANY: Shame, Shame, Shame (Rhino, VA: Bo Diddley Beats)
HAPPY MONDAYS: 24 Hour Party People (Rhino, VA: Left Of The Dial)
P. HUX: This Is The One (Nine 18, This Is The One)
THE STONE ROSES: She Bangs The Drums (Rhino, VA: Left Of The Dial)
--
SEX CLARK FIVE: I Want You Mine (Records To Russia, Live!)
THE ENGLISH BEAT: Mirror In The Bathroom (Rhino, VA: Left Of The Dial)
THE BUZZCOCKS: Wish I Never Loved You (Cooking Vinyl, Flat Pack Philosophy)
PETE TOWNSHEND: Rough Boys (Atlantic, Empty Glass)
PETE SHELLEY: Homosapien (Universal, Homosapien)
THE UNDERTONES: Teenage Kicks (Rykodisc, Undertones)
--
THE BUZZCOCKS: You Say You Don't Love Me (IRS, A Different Kind Of Tension Pts. 1-3)
THE DEAD MILKMEN: Punk Rock Girl (Rhino, VA: Left Of The Dial)
COTTON MATHER: The Book Of Too Late Changes (Star Apple Kingdom, Death Of The Cool)
INGA: The Beat Goes On (Grosse Freiheit, VA: Beat Frauleins)
THE NON PROPHETS: Keep You You (unreleased)
THE MONKEES: Me & Magdalena [Version 2] (Rhino, Good Times! [digital version])
--
DEAN LANDEW: After Work (deanlandew.bandcamp.com)
GRAHAM PARKER & THE RUMOUR: Discovering Japan (Spectrum, The Very Best Of Graham Parker & The Rumour)
THE BUZZCOCKS: Thunder Of Hearts (Go-Kart, Modern)
THE MICKEY FINN: Garden Of My Mind (MOJO, VA: Paint It Black)
T. REX: 20th Century Boy (Crimson, The Very Best Of T. Rex)
HAWKWIND: Motorhead (MOJO, VA: Pretty Vacant)
--
THE BUZZCOCKS: Harmony In My Head (IRS, Singles Going Steady)
THE CLASH: White Riot (Epic, Clash On Broadway)
THE KINKS: See My Friends (Sanctuary, The Ultimate Collection)
THE 101'ERS: Keys To Your Heart (MOJO, VA: Pretty Vacant)
CHRIS PAINE & THE LETTERTRAIN: Might Have Found Me (chrispainemusic.com, Indiscriminate Chatter)
WARREN ZEVON: Werewolves Of London (Rhino, Genius)
--
THE SEX PISTOLS: God Save The Queen (Virgin, Kiss This)
THE MODERN LOVERS: Roadrunner (Rhino, VA: No, Thanks!)
THE BUZZCOCKS: Some Kinda Wonderful (Domino, All Set)
MONIQUE & THE LIONS: Er Sah Mich Im Regen (Grosse Freiheit, VA: Beat Frauleins)
THE RAMONES: All's Quiet On The Eastern Front (Rhino, Pleasant Dreams)
THE NEW YORK DOLLS: Personality Crisis (Mercury, New York Dolls)
--
QUEEN: Killer Queen (EMI, VA: The Cavern)
THE WHO: Magic Bus (MCA, Who's Better, Who's Best)
VEGAS WITH RANDOLPH: She's An Intellectual (Caged Giant, Legs & Luggage)
BRAM TCHAIKOVSKY: Girl Of My Dreams (Polydor, Strange Man, Changed Man)
THE BUZZCOCKS: Last To Know (Caroline, Trade Test Transmissions)
THE MOTORS: Dancing The Night Away (Rhino, VA: No, Thanks!)
--
THE BUZZCOCKS: I Don't Mind (IRS, Singles Going Steady)
THE BUZZCOCKS: Why Can't I Touch It? (IRS, Singles Going Steady)
THE BUZZCOCKS: Everybody's Happy Nowadays (IRS, Singles Going Steady)
THE BUZZCOCKS: I Believe (IRS, A Different Kind Of Tension Pts. 1-3)
THE BUZZCOCKS: Ever Fallen In Love (IRS, Singles Going Steady)
THE BUZZCOCKS: Walking Distance (Domino, Love Bites)

Sunday, December 9, 2018

Tonight On THIS IS ROCK 'N' ROLL RADIO



The Buzzcocks. Yeah, we're gonna play some Buzzcocks. Our Featured Act this week is The Buzzcocks. Sunday night, 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ-LP 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Hoya Season



Time once again for this annual message:

Duck season? Rabbit season? Don't be silly--IT'S HOYA SEASON!

Go Orange.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0c0uEHOCv4&t=496s


THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE: "Porpoise Song (Theme From 'Head')"

This was originally distributed privately on November 1, 2018 to paid patrons of Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do). This is its first public appearance. For $2 a month, my patrons receive a private post at least one month before anyone else gets to see it.

An infinite number of rockin' pop records can be the greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. Today, this is THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE!


THE MONKEES: "Porpoise Song (Theme From Head)"

It was over. It was the end. The moneymen knew it. The players did not. The players had no idea how distant the year 1968 was from 1967. The calendar insisted it had been just one year; instead, it may as well have been a lifetime.

The Monkees were on top of the pop world in '67. The made-for-TV quartet--Micky Dolenz, Davy Jones, Peter Tork, and Michael Nesmith--were at the peak of their popularity, with a hit TV show promoting big, big hit records, successful concert dates to prove the manufactured band could perform as a real band, opportunities to hobnob with The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, and all of rock 'n' roll's biggest names, and a chance to make their own music after freeing themselves from the yoke of Golden-Eared but shortsighted Musical Supervisor Don Kirshner. By some accounts, The Monkees in 1967 outsold The Beatles and The Rolling Stones combined; Nesmith later insisted he'd manufactured that claim himself, and that people took this fib as truth. Whether a lie or a Gospel, it was plausible. 1967 was the summer of love. It was the summer of Sgt. Pepper. If The Monkees weren't really bigger than The Beatles, they were nonetheless awfully big indeed.

And it all went away in 1968.

Those of us who dream of fame, who worship glittery idols from afar, can't even imagine how fame could be so fickle, so fleeting. The swift fall from grace is the oldest story in the world and in the heavens, from Lucifer to Adam and Eve. In '68, The Monkees' TV series was cancelled after two seasons. The Monkees believed they could continue successfully without that exposure. "D.W. Washburn," the first Monkees single released after the TV series' end, barely made it into the Top 20, whereas the six previous Monkees A-sides had hit # 1, # 1, # 2, # 3, # 1, and # 6. No subsequent Monkees single would even crack the Top 40 during the remainder of the group's original run.

The Monkees weren't worried yet. So what if one single underperformed? They just needed to reestablish themselves, away from the TV image. Credibility would come, and success would return. The Monkees would make a movie. Not an extended, goofy 'n' giddy expansion of their now-defunct cathode-ray capers, but something hip, something far-out, something for a turned-on, tuned-in now audience. The film would be called Head, it would be a triumphant exposé of the artificial machinations that fabricated the Monkees phenomenon, and it would surely build a bridge for those hip heads in The Monkees to cross over to new success.

Head was ultimately a dark, bitter, and brilliant film, mesmerizing in its wanton deconstruction of The Monkees, chortling about their manufactured image with no philosophies. It was a box office failure; the kids who liked The Monkees were confused and alienated by the movie, and the hippie clientele the film hoped to reach wouldn't have been caught gratefully dead at a Monkees flick. Head's opening sequence depicted Micky Dolenz running away, jumping off one of the largest suspended arch bridges in the world, and plunging into the presumed tomb of the deep blue sea, that other Davy Jones' locker. Micky's prime mates follow him off the bridge and into the water, all escorted by psychedelic mermaids into the next phase. It was supposed to be the TV Monkees committing suicide; the real Monkees' career was euthanized right along with it.



For all of that, Head's woeful ticket sales and lack of contemporary appreciation don't stop it from being one of my favorite movies. Its existence and its ambition add great depth to The Monkees' story. And its soundtrack music is simply amazing. 



I discovered all of this well after the fact. I was eight years old in 1968, and I doubt I even knew that this group I liked on TV had also made a movie. I saw Head on a late-night CBS TV broadcast in the '70s, but it didn't really register with me then; I embraced it in the mid '80s. I got to the soundtrack LP in 1977; that blew me away immediately. "Daddy's Song.""As We Go Along." "Circle Sky." "Can You Dig It." "Do I Have To Do This All Over Again." The snarky-cool "Ditty Diego/War Chant," with the prefabs gleefully declaring The money's in, we're made of tin, we're here to give you MORE! Snippets of dialogue. Strings. Dandruff. Supernatural baloney. I'd like a glass of cold gravy with a hair in it, please.

Divorced from its visual image, the record made little sense. As I would later discover, the visual and audio also made little sense when combined together. But it was glorious. Glorious. For those who look for meaning, and form as they do fact, The Monkees might tell you one thing, but they'll only take it back.



Both the album and the film begin with "Porpoise Song (Theme From Head)," a Carole King-Gerry Goffin composition that feels like a communiqué from Other. Actually, the album and the film both begin with an attempt by a long-winded representative of The Man to try to dedicate the opening of the above-mentioned large suspended bridge, pushed aside by seemingly suicidal Monkees.  Then the song begin to play, and the Head trip truly begins.

Is it possible for a song to brood and soar at the same time? You wouldn't think so, but "Porpoise Song" somehow manages to simultaneously reflect on its own mysteries while making its leap of faith, to reach toward the heavens while plummeting into the foamy abyss below. 

My my
The clock in the sky is pounding away
And there's so much to say
A face, a voice
An overdub has no choice
An image cannot rejoice

Wanting to be
To hear and to see
Crying to the sky
But the porpoise is laughing
Goodbye, goodbye!
Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye!

And the cuddly Monkees' fate is sealed in a watery grave. Good thing those psychedelic mermaids are there.



Everyone who knows me knows that I love The Monkees. I love the TV series, I love the prefab Kirshner-era records, the hey-hey-we're-a-real band triumph of the Headquarters LP, the Monkees with sidemen compromise of Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones, Ltd. (my favorite Monkees album), the schtick, the ambition, the songs, the image, the truth behind the image. I'm a believer already. But there's something emphatically special about the movie Head and its soundtrack. It's part of the grit that gives the cotton candy substance.

"Porpoise Song" towers majestically above it all. If it had been the only track ever released under the Monkees brand name, we would still revere the sheer wonder of The Monkees on that basis alone. 

The moneymen knew it was over. Monkees producers Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider were gettin' out while the getting was good, leaving Monkeeshines permanently behind them, Rafelson in particular en route to a successful and celebrated career as an auteur. Head was their killing stroke to The Monkees as they moved on; subsequent films Easy Rider and Five Easy Pieces were largely financed with Monkee money. The latter film starred a then-unknown actor named Jack Nicholson, who had co-written Head with Rafelson, based in part on rambling, pot-fueled conversations with The Monkees. The Monkees did not receive a writing credit. The Monkees did not know that it was over. But the porpoise was laughing, goodbye, goodbye.



It took decades for the members of The Monkees to come to terms with whatever the hell it was they went through in that short, explosive combustion of fame and sudden seeming irrelevance. They came back, of course. Reruns of the TV series and perpetual airplay on oldies radio assured that The Monkees could never be fully forgotten. When you see the end in sight, the beginning may arrive. They reunited, in varying combinations, with varying levels of success. Even though Davy Jones passed away in 2012, The Monkees managed to become timeless, perennial. The ego sings of castles and kings and things that go with a life of style

When my first spin of the Head LP immersed me inside this captivating magic of "Porpoise Song," my belief in The Monkees was validated. Each spin renews that. Wanting to feel, to know what is real. The moneymen were wrong: it wasn't the end. It sure looked like the end, with their former puppets descending fatalistically into the water's cold embrace. But the porpoise was waiting. Goodbye? Not yet.

"Porpoise Song (Theme From Head)" written by Carole King and Gerry Goffin





TIP THE BLOGGER: CC's Tip Jar!

You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Our new compilation CD This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio, Volume 4 is now available from Kool Kat Musik! 29 tracks of irresistible rockin' pop, starring Pop Co-OpRay PaulCirce Link & Christian NesmithVegas With Randolph Featuring Lannie FlowersThe SlapbacksP. HuxIrene PeñaMichael Oliver & the Sacred Band Featuring Dave MerrittThe RubinoosStepford KnivesThe Grip WeedsPopdudesRonnie DarkThe Flashcubes,Chris von SneidernThe Bottle Kids1.4.5.The SmithereensPaul Collins' BeatThe Hit SquadThe RulersThe Legal MattersMaura & the Bright LightsLisa Mychols, and Mr. Encrypto & the Cyphers. You gotta have it, so order it here. A digital download version (minus The Smithereens' track) is also available from Futureman Records.

Friday, December 7, 2018

Lights! Camera! REACTION! My Life At The Movies: These Are A Few Of My Favorite Films



As a proud and obsessive fan of pop culture, I like to immerse myself in the stuff I love. That immersion occasionally prompts me to slap together lists of my All-Time Fave Rave sumpin-sumpins, usually lists of Hot 100 (or more) Top Pop Songs. Because songs are immediate, short, and infinite, it's easier for me to wrap my brain around the giddy pleasures of specific 45s and LP tracks than to consider my top choices among longer-form works, like favorite books, or favorite television series, or favorite comic book series. And it's certainly true that I would have a hard time thinking through a list of my all-time favorite movies.

So I'm not going to do that. Instead, I want to just list some movies that I've liked a lot, or even loved, at some point over the span of my five and a half decades of movie-watchin'. Some of these I haven't seen in a long time, and are listed here by virtue of fond memories, memories which might or might not evaporate if given a fresh visit today. Some are more recent favorites, still cast in the cozy glow of an evening at the cinema. In contrast, some films I used to love (like Forrest Gump, Gone With The Wind, and Good Morning Viet Nam) have fallen out of my consciousness. There are a few I don't remember well enough to consider, including Humphrey Bogart (possibly my favorite actor) in The Big Sleep and To Have And Have Not. Time for another screening!

At this writing, the last movie I saw was the wonderful Christopher Robin at the likewise-wonderful Hollywood Theatre in Mattydale, NY; as much as I enjoyed that movie, I decided not to list it here, for reasons that boil down to no real reason, just because. Might be the same reason I didn't list any James Bond movies, even though I generally like 007, or why I don't list all of the Marvel Comics movies, a movie universe that I enjoy without apology. No real reason.

This list arbitrarily excludes documentaries and concert films (the swell Won't You Be My Neighbor was my most recently-seen documentary, The TAMI Show my all-time favorite concert film). Whenever I talk about movies, I have to admit that I've never seen a Hitchcock film, nor have I seen The Godfather, 2001: A Space Odyssey, or any recent Best Picture nominee. The only Fellini film I ever saw was La Strada, and it was not my cuppa. I'm not a film buff, and I don't say that to seem iconoclastic, or edgy, or to celebrate my status as a Philistine. I know nothing, I know that I know nothing, and I know enough to know there's no virtue in ignorance. This list is not a statement. It's what its title says it is: These are a few of my favorite films.



(I do have an all-time # 1 favorite film; it's Tom Hanks' rockin' pop comedy That Thing You Do! I feel no shame in embracing the sheer joy of that terrific movie as my toppermost of the poppermost, narrowly edging out The Beatles in A Hard Day's Night and Frank Capra's It's A Wonderful Life. The rest? Read on.)






48 Hours
The Adventures Of Captain Marvel
Airplane!
American Hot Wax
And Now For Something Completely Different
Animal House
Annie Hall
Avengers: Infinity War
Back To The Future
Batman (1966)
Batman (1989)
Batman: Mask Of The Phantasm
Batman Begins
Beverly Hills Cop
Big
Billy Jack
Black Panther
Blazing Saddles
Brain Donors
Bye Bye Birdie
The Breakfast Club
The Buddy Holly Story
Captain America: The First Avenger
Casablanca
Casino Royale (1967)
Cat Ballou
The Cider House Rules
Citizen Kane
City Lights
Coco
The Dark Knight
A Day At The Races
The Dead Poets Society
Die Hard
Dr. Strangelove Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb
E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
Eight Men Out
The Empire Strikes Back
The Express
Fail Safe
Field Of Dreams
Finding Dory
Finding Nemo
A Fish Called Wanda
The Front
Get On Up
The Girl Can't Help It
Glory Road
The Gold Rush
Good Night And Good Luck
The Grapes Of Wrath
The Great Dictator
The Groove Tube
Groundhog Day
A Hard Day's Night
Having A Wild Weekend
Head
Help!
High Noon
The Hotel New Hampshire
HouseSitter
I Want To Hold Your Hand
Indiana Jones And The Last Crusade
Iron Man
It's A Wonderful Life
The Jerk
Kentucky Fried Movie
A King In New York
A League Of Our Own
Limelight
Love And Death
Love And Mercy
Major League
The Maltese Falcon
The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance
The Mark Of Zorro (1940)
Marvel's The Avengers
Mary Poppins
The Mask Of Zorro
Miracle On 34th Street (1947)
The Missiles Of October [TV movie]
Modern Times
Monkey Business
Monty Python And The Holy Grail
My Favorite Year
Network
A Night At The Opera
On The Waterfront
Our Town [1977 TV movie]
The Producers (1967)
Pulp Fiction
Raiders Of The Lost Ark
Road To Perdition
Rock 'n' Roll High School
Rocky
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
Romeo And Juliet (1968)
Singin' In The Rain
Silent Movie
Slaughterhouse Five
Sleeper
Some Like It Hot
The Sound Of Music
Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan
Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home
Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country
Star Wars
Star Wars: The Force Awakens
The Sting
Superman
Superman II
Superman And The Mole Men
Stand By Me
Tarzan's New York Adventure
That Thing You Do!
This Is Spinal Tap
To Be Or Not To Be (1942; Mel Brooks' 1983 remake was good, too)
Toy Story
Toy Story 3
Veronica Mars
West Side Story
Wonder Woman
The World According To Garp
Young Frankenstein





TIP THE BLOGGER: CC's Tip Jar!
You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Our new compilation CD This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio, Volume 4 is now available from Kool Kat Musik! 29 tracks of irresistible rockin' pop, starring Pop Co-OpRay PaulCirce Link & Christian NesmithVegas With Randolph Featuring Lannie FlowersThe SlapbacksP. HuxIrene PeñaMichael Oliver & the Sacred Band Featuring Dave MerrittThe RubinoosStepford KnivesThe Grip WeedsPopdudesRonnie DarkThe Flashcubes,Chris von SneidernThe Bottle Kids1.4.5.The SmithereensPaul Collins' BeatThe Hit SquadThe RulersThe Legal MattersMaura & the Bright LightsLisa Mychols, and Mr. Encrypto & the Cyphers. You gotta have it, so order it here. A digital download version (minus The Smithereens' track) is also available from Futureman Records.

Thursday, December 6, 2018

Fake THIS IS ROCK 'N' ROLL RADIO Playlist: The Concerts I Didn't See

This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl is simply too large a concept to be neatly contained within a mere three-hour weekly time slot. Hence these occasional fake TIRnRR playlists, detailing shows we're never really going to do...but could.


I've had the good fortune to see a lot of concerts. My virtual ticket stub gallery is decent, but there were still many more acts I never got around to seeing. Some, granted, I never had any realistic shot of experiencing in a live setting; there was never a Chuck Berry or Sex Pistols show anywhere near me in my adult life, Little Richard's Syracuse stop was as a preacher rather than as The Georgia Peach, and The Beatles stopped touring when I was six. Elvis Presley performed in Syracuse when I was a teenager (and had a return appearance scheduled the week he left the building for good), but my interest in King Elvis I didn't develop until later. Some others were simply missed opportunities and/or almosts, where different sets of circumstances, decisions, finances, whims, or miscellaneous other slings 'n' arrows could have placed me where I should have been, in the club or concert hall, bellowing away in attempted harmony with the rock stars all lit up in front of me. Rawk!

This fake TIRnRR playlist slaps together selections from a number of acts I never saw live, but woulda coulda shoulda sorta. I've only included acts where there seemed a plausible chance that I could have been at the show in question. For example, I remember a radio commercial for an appearance by Slade here in Syracuse circa...1973, maybe? There was no way in hell this thirteen-year-old was getting anywhere within hand-stompin' and foot-clappin' proximity of that, so we do not see Slade on this playlist. On the other hand, Good Rats played on campus when I was a student at Brockport, so I certainly could have been there...if I had been the least bit interested in Good Rats. No. No Good Rats here.

Instead, the list is comprised of concerts that almost seemed within reach at one point. The Lou Reed, Devo, Bruce Wooley & the Camera Club, and Dave Davies shows were cancelled. I was denied parental permission to see Suzi Quatro open for Alice Cooper in 1975. I sold my ticket to McGuinn, Clark & Hillman because I was a dumbass who didn't think their live show would include any songs by their former group, The Byrds. I skipped James Brown because I was an even bigger dumbass afraid of being the only white guy there (one of the Top 20 stupidest decisions I ever made). Dr. Demento was sold out before I could get tickets. A fight with my girlfriend scotched my plan to The Heartbreakers (starring my guitar hero Johnny Thunders). I didn't have transportation to get to where Steve Forbert and Eddie & the Hot Rods were, and my own car broke down when we were on our way to see Miami Sound Machine. I made it to the Cayuga County Fairgrounds for the British Invasion package that was supposed to include Gerry & the Pacemakers, but Gerry himself didn't show.

Often, I missed shows because I was out with the in crowd, as opportunities fell victim to indecision, indifference, or insufficient funds (or even influenza, since I was sick as a dog and crashed on the couch the night Mannix came to town). Inopportune timing killed my chance to see The Bodeans or The Godfathers, both of whom played separate gigs in Syracuse the same night I opted to see The Ventures instead. Oh, and let's not forget income; I couldn't get off work for the Grateful Dead, Cyndi Lauper, or Go-Go's shows. 

I wish I could have seen all of the acts I missed. And I did get to see a few of these players in other incarnations (Dave Davies in The Kinks, Johnny Thunders, Debbie Harry). I remain blessed to have seen so many wonderful shows.This fake TIRnRR playlist is dedicated to the ones that got away. 


This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl--y'know, the real one--plays Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse on The Spark WSPJ-LP 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/

Spark Syracuse is supported by listeners like you. Tax-deductible donations are welcome at http://sparksyracuse.org/support/


You can follow Carl's daily blog Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do) at 

https://carlcafarelli.blogspot.com/

Our new compilation CD This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio, Volume 4 is now available from Kool Kat Musik! 29 tracks of irresistible rockin' pop, starring Pop Co-OpRay PaulCirce Link & Christian NesmithVegas With Randolph Featuring Lannie FlowersThe SlapbacksP. HuxIrene PeñaMichael Oliver & the Sacred Band Featuring Dave MerrittThe RubinoosStepford KnivesThe Grip WeedsPopdudesRonnie DarkThe FlashcubesChris von SneidernThe Bottle Kids1.4.5.The SmithereensPaul Collins' BeatThe Hit SquadThe RulersThe Legal MattersMaura & the Bright LightsLisa Mychols, and Mr. Encrypto & the Cyphers. You gotta have it, so order it at https://tinyurl.com/ycnly8oz Digital download version (minus The Smithereens' track) now available at 
https://tinyurl.com/ycauy9xt


Fake TIRnRR Playlist: The Concerts I Didn't See

R.E.M.: Radio Free Europe
--
ALICE COOPER: School's Out
PENETRATION: Don't Dictate
THE LAUGHING DOGS: Get 'Im Outa Town
THE GO-GO'S: We Got The Beat
McGUINN, CLARKE & HILLMAN: Don't You Write Her Off
X: True Love
--
JAMES BROWN: Please, Please, Please
DEL SHANNON: Keep Searchin'
RICK NELSON: Garden Party
LOS LOBOS: Will The Wolf Survive
THE POLICE: Roxanne
ELLIOTT MURPHY: Drive All Night
--
LOU REED: Vicious
HANSON: MMMBop
HOT CHOCOLATE: You Sexy Thing
BRUCE WOOLEY & THE CAMERA CLUB: Video Killed The Radio Star
DEVO: Uncontrollable Urge
EDDIE & THE HOT RODS: Do Anything You Wanna Do
--
SUZI QUATRO: I May Be Too Young
STEVE FORBERT: Romeo's Tune
MANNIX: Highway Lines
THE DEAD BOYS: All This And More
THE TROGGS: I Can't Control Myself
CYNDI LAUPER: All Through The Night
--
THE HEARTBREAKERS: Chinese Rocks
SOUTHSIDE JOHNNY & THE ASBURY JUKES: I Don't Want To Go Home
THE GRATEFUL DEAD: Uncle John's Band
THE BODEANS: Only Love
THE GODFATHERS: Birth, School, Love, Death
ARETHA FRANKLIN: Respect
--
SMOKEY ROBINSON: Cruisin'
DR. DEMENTO: Shaving Cream
MAGAZINE: Shot By Both Sides
MIAMI SOUND MACHINE: Conga
GERRY & THE PACEMAKERS: Ferry Cross The Mersey
STEVIE WONDER: Signed, Sealed, Delivered I'm Yours
--
THE WHO: I Can't Explain
HEART: Crazy On You
BLONDIE: The Tide Is High
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN: The Ties That Bind
JUDAS PRIEST: Heading Out To The Highway
THE PENETRATORS: Teenage Lifestyle
--
THE LONG RYDERS: Lights Of Downtown
LORETTA LYNN: Coal Miner's Daughter
INXS: The One Thing
THE ZOMBIES: This Will Be Our Year
TODD RUNDGREN: Couldn't I Just Tell You
ECHO & THE BUNNYMEN: The Cutter
FOGHAT: Fool For The City
DAVE DAVIES: Death Of A Clown
DIZZY GILLESPIE: A Night In Tunisia

Wednesday, December 5, 2018

100-Page FAKES! presents: ADVENTURE COMICS # 439 [with THE SPECTRE and THE SEVEN SOLDIERS OF VICTORY]

100-Page FAKES! imagines mid-1970s DC 100-Page Super Spectaculars that never were...but should have been!



Continuing our run of faux 100-Page Super Spectacular expansions of Adventure Comics, we come to the second Adventure Comics appearance of The Seven Soldiers Of Victory. The first two chapters of this story-- written in the '40s, then illustrated and published in the '70s--were in the previous issue, already embiggened as the 100-Page FAKES! edition of Adventure Comics # 438. The story has never been reprinted. 100-Page FAKES! intends to cover the remaining issues in that run over the next few weeks.

That ghostly avenger The Spectre is nearing the end of his run as the lead feature in Adventure, but he's going out in style. "The Voice That Doomed...The Spectre" is the first of a thrilling two-part story by Michael Fleisher, in which The Spectre is returned to mortal form, given a chance to live again as Detective Jim Corrigan. Following a couple of issues where he shared the art chores, the great Jim Aparo returns here as the sole artist, and he returns to characteristically stunning effect. Although this two-parter wasn't intended to be The Spectre's finale, it does serve as a fitting and satisfying end for this controversial series.

How do you follow Jim Aparo? With more Aparo! Aparo's 1968-1971 run on Aquaman (with writer Steve Skeates and editor Dick Giordano) remains my all-time favorite take on the Sea King. For this issue's reprints, we include a particularly trippy Skeates story from 1970's Aquaman # 54, with some simply dazzling Aparo artwork that borders (and occasionally invades!) the psychedelic. Here's Skeates' original text piece about the story:




Why hasn't DC reprinted the entire Skeates-Aparo Aquaman...?!

To round things out, we have Golden Age exploits of Bulletman and Bulletgirl and The Guardian and The Newsboy Legion, plus the 1968 introduction of Jonny Double. Roll credits!

The Spectre in "The Voice That Doomed...The Spectre," Adventure Comics # 439 (May-June 1975)
Aquaman in "Crime Wave!," Aquaman # 54 (November-December 1970)
Bulletman and Bulletgirl in "The Halloween Murders!," Master Comics # 73 (October 1948)
The Newsboy Legion in "Brains For Sale!," Star-Spangled Comics # 22 (July 1943)
Jonny Double in "Meet Jonny Double!," Showcase # 78 (November 1968)
The Green Arrow and Speedy in "Father Time's Inn!," Adventure Comics # 439 (May-June 1975)

Everything here is copyright DC Comics Inc. The Bulletman and Bulletgirl story is now public domain, but the rest can only be depicted here via representative sample pages. I share the whole book with my paid patrons. The Spectre! Aquaman! JIM APARO! The other guys, too! Once again, it's time for Adventure.


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Our new compilation CD This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio, Volume 4 is now available from Kool Kat Musik! 29 tracks of irresistible rockin' pop, starring Pop Co-OpRay PaulCirce Link & Christian NesmithVegas With Randolph Featuring Lannie FlowersThe SlapbacksP. HuxIrene PeñaMichael Oliver & the Sacred Band Featuring Dave MerrittThe RubinoosStepford KnivesThe Grip WeedsPopdudesRonnie DarkThe Flashcubes,Chris von SneidernThe Bottle Kids1.4.5.The SmithereensPaul Collins' BeatThe Hit SquadThe RulersThe Legal MattersMaura & the Bright LightsLisa Mychols, and Mr. Encrypto & the Cyphers. You gotta have it, so order it here. A digital download version (minus The Smithereens' track) is also available from Futureman Records.
















COVER GALLERY