About Me

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I'm the co-host of THIS IS ROCK 'N' ROLL RADIO with Dana & Carl (Sunday nights, 9 to Midnight Eastern, www.westcottradio.org).  As a freelance writer, I contributed to Goldmine magazine from 1986-2006, wrote liner notes for Rhino Records' compilation CD Poptopia!  Power Pop Classics Of The '90s, and for releases by The Flashcubes, The Finkers, Screen Test, 1.4.5., and Jack "Penetrator" Lipton.  I contributed to the books Bubblegum Music Is The Naked Truth, Shake Some Action, Lost In The Grooves, and MusicHound Rock, and to DISCoveries, Amazing Heroes, The Comics Buyer's Guide, Yeah Yeah Yeah, Comics Collector, The Buffalo News, and The Syracuse New Times.  I also wrote the liner notes for the four THIS IS ROCK 'N' ROLL RADIO compilation CDs, because, well, who could stop me?  My standing offer to write liner notes for a Bay City Rollers compilation has remained criminally ignored.  Still intend to write and sell a Batman story someday.

Friday, November 17, 2017

Lights! Camera! REACTION! My Life At The Movies, Part 2: Superhero Movies



My first superhero movie was Batman in 1966. I was six years old, a huge fan of the twice-a-week televised adventures of Batman and Robin, so it was quite the big deal to see my Caped Crusaders crusade on the big screen against the combined nefarious might of The Joker, The Penguin, The Riddler, and Catwoman. I couldn't quite understand why I was sssshed from shouting out the POW!s and BIFF!s that accompanied the climactic fight scene--I was always able to do that when watching at home--but nothing could dilute the thrill of seeing superheroes at the movies.

It would be a long, long time before I would have another chance to do that.




In today's world of cinematic superhero plenty, a time before blockbuster Marvel and DC films at the cineplex seems long ago and far away. But the success of the Batman TV series in '66 did not translate into boffo box office in theaters, nor did it inspire any feature-film imitations in Hollywood. Unless you count Barbarella in 1968 or even Modesty Blaise in '66--and you shouldn't really count either as part of this specific discussion--there wasn't anything else that could be called a mass-market comic-book or superhero film until Doc Savage: The Man Of Bronze in 1975. I was a fan of the Doc Savage pulp novels and Marvel's comic-book adaptation, but I'm not aware of the movie ever playing in Syracuse. (I finally had a chance to see it on either cable or home video many years later, but I have yet to make it through the whole film; it's pretty bad.)

In the interim, I had discovered superhero movie serials from the '40s. Not quite the same thing, sure, but I was happy to have 'em. My introduction to these quaint artifacts was Super 8 home movies, specifically silent, abridged versions of two chapters apiece from 1941's The Adventures Of Captain Marvel and 1943's Batman. I then saw the Captain Marvel serial in its entirety in a looooong evening screening at The Syracuse Cinephile Society. I also saw the 1936 Flash Gordon serial, split over the course of two different weekend screenings at The Hollywood Theater, the same Mattydale, NY movie house where I'd seen the '66 Batman. In the mid '70s, the popularity of the late actor Bruce Lee (who had played the role of Kato in the 1967 TV series The Green Hornet) prompted a theatrical release for Kato And The Green Hornet; this was an ineptly-edited compilation of three episodes of the TV series, but I saw it in a movie theater, so I guess it counts as a superhero movie.





In the mid '70s, there were rumors of new superhero films on the horizon, particularly a proposed big-budget version of Superman. Rumor had it that the Man of Steel would be played by Robert Redford! Or not. The role eventually went to an unknown actor named Christopher Reeve. He was...um, he was pretty damned good in the role. There were also rumors of a Batman film, a Vampirella film (which had cast actress and model Barbara Leigh in the role, but which was never made), a Silver Surfer film. But even the successes of Star Wars and Superman couldn't get any of these films out of development limbo. The closest thing was an awful Flash Gordon movie in 1980.



I had mixed feelings about the Superman movies. Reeve was just flawless in the dual role of Clark Kent and Superman, and Margot Kidder was likewise a terrific Lois Lane. But the overall tone wasn't quite...right. In the first film, released in 1978, the opening sequence had an epic feel that felt nothing short of awe-inspiring. The early scenes on the planet Krypton, with Marlon Brando as Superman's daddy Jor-El, had an undeniable gravitas. The Smallville scenes, with young Clark Kent learning his moral code from adoptive father Jonathan Kent (expertly played by Glenn Ford), were affecting and heartbreaking. But the tone changed abruptly when the narrative switched to present-day Metropolis, and the audience was introduced to Lex Luthor's oafish henchman Otis (Ned Beatty). Gene Hackman's Luthor projected murderous intent, but always seemed a pratfall away from a descent into camp humor. I got the feeling that the filmmakers, including director Richard Donner, weren't so much reluctant to take a superhero film seriously as they were simply unable to fathom the idea of taking a superhero film seriously. Superman II, directed by Richard Lester, had a lot going for it, but Lester was even less--far less!--interested in straight superheroics than Donner had been. I don't mean to quibble, then or now, because I loved those first two Superman movies, their flaws notwithstanding; I still wish those flaws weren't there, though.

There was no real relief in sight for superhero film fans in the '80s. Reeve made two more Superman movies, each one a waste of his talents (though he shoulders some of the blame for the final entry, 1987's Superman IV: The Quest For Peace, which he helped brainstorm). There was a lackluster Supergirl movie. There were rumors of Marvel superhero movies. And, in 1989, there was Michael Keaton in Batman, arguably the first superhero film to play it straight. It was a blockbuster hit, and I loved it. That franchise went south real fast, but the '89 film proved that a straight superhero film could be done.



It took a while for that lesson to take hold. With the first X-Men film in 2000, the first Spider-Man film in 2002, Batman Begins in 2005, and the dawn of the Marvel Cinematic Universe with Iron Man in 2008, the current era of successful superhero movies began in earnest, and it shows no sign of ceasing. This year's fantastic Wonder Woman may be the greatest superhero film I've ever seen. And I've seen a lot of them!



I don't see every superhero movie that comes along, but I do see most of them. I'm one of the relatively few folks who liked 2016's Batman v Superman: Dawn Of Justice. Tonight, my sister and I are going to see its new sequel, Justice League. It's a long way from when we saw Adam West in Batman more than five decades ago. But I'll still cheer the heroes, boo the villains, and exult in the spectacle of comic-book superheroes coming to life before my widened eyes. It's a sense of wonder I don't ever intend to relinquish.

I'll exult quietly, though. Don't want anyone to haveta ssssh me for yellin' out the POW!s and BIFF!s.



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You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Our new compilation CD This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio, Volume 4 is now available from Kool Kat Musik! 29 tracks of irresistible rockin' pop, starring Pop Co-OpRay PaulCirce Link & Christian NesmithVegas With Randolph Featuring Lannie FlowersThe SlapbacksP. HuxIrene PeñaMichael Oliver & the Sacred Band Featuring Dave MerrittThe RubinoosStepford KnivesThe Grip WeedsPopdudesRonnie DarkThe Flashcubes,Chris von SneidernThe Bottle Kids1.4.5.The SmithereensPaul Collins' BeatThe Hit SquadThe RulersThe Legal MattersMaura & the Bright LightsLisa Mychols, and Mr. Encrypto & the Cyphers. You gotta have it, so order it here.



Thursday, November 16, 2017

THE EVERLASTING FIRST Part 16a: My First Exposures To Some Singers And Superheroes

Continuing a look back at my first exposure to a number of rock 'n' roll acts and superheroes (or other denizens of print or periodical publication), some of which were passing fancies, and some of which I went on to kinda like. They say you never forget your first time; that may be true, but it's the subsequent visits--the second time, the fourth time, the twentieth time, the hundredth time--that define our relationships with the things we cherish. Ultimately, the first meeting is less important than what comes after that. But every love story still needs to begin with that first kiss.

TODAY'S LETTER IS P



GENE PITNEY

It might not take much for you to convince me that Gene Pitney records have existed throughout modern times, that Eliot Ness listened to "Town Without Pity" while planning his crusade against Al Capone, that doughboys sang "Last Chance To Turn Around" en route to the trenches in The War To End All Wars, that Doc Holliday whistled "(The Man Who Shot) Liberty Valance" as he neared the O.K. Corral, or that William Shakespeare's final thoughts within this mortal coil were of Pitney declaring "I'm Gonna Be Strong." I'd know you were lying, sure; but a part of me might believe it, only because I can't remember a time when I couldn't listen to Gene Pitney. Before The Beatles. Before I can recall hearing Elvis Presley, long before I heard Chuck Berry or Buddy Holly or nearly anyone else. As far back as I can remember, there was always, always Gene Pitney.

My earliest conscious memories date back to 1963, when I was three years old. I can remember watching as my crib was dismantled and put into storage. I remember being at the home of one of my Mom's friends in North Syracuse, and being given a choice of diapers or underwear; Speedos were not yet in popular use. I remember JFK, but only vicariously, through impressionist Vaughn Meader and his hit comedy album The First Family. I remember family and friends, playing outdoors and watching TV indoors. I remember music: LPs of original Broadway casts and 45s of rock 'n' roll, Chubby Checker on my Aunt Anna's hi-fi, The Four Seasons on the radio.

And, of course, I remember Gene Pitney.

My older siblings deserve the credit for my damned near in vitro introduction to Pitney. My brothers Art and Rob are respectively about 15 and 13 years older than me, my sister Denise eight years my senior. Much of the essential and prevailing pop culture I absorbed in the '60s came from them, and I can never thank them enough for that. I couldn't tell you which of them owned a copy of the Gene Pitney Sings World-Wide Winners album, but I can tell you that LP was in the family record collection in the same time frame as my crib demolition and The First Family's directive to vote for the Kennedy of your choice, but vote! 



And I can tell you that record got played. Before I could read, I could sing along with Gene Pitney's world-wide winners "Town Without Pity,""(The Man Who Shot) Liberty Valance,""I Wanna Love My Life Away," "Half Heaven Half Heartache," and "Hello Mary Lou." That last one, "Hello Mary Lou," was a song Pitney had written for Ricky Nelson, but I knew it as a Gene Pitney record. I don't remember hearing Gene Pitney on the radio, and I don't remember hearing him on the jukebox at The Moose Club, nor on other people's record players. At home? Yeah, I heard plenty of Gene Pitney at home.

For all that, I didn't follow Gene Pitney through the rest of the '60s. My sister Denise went to see Pitney in concert at The New York State Fair around '66 or so, but I wasn't even aware that she did. Nor was I aware of any Pitney songs after the familiar classics on that World-Wide Winners LP. I was aware of The Beatles, The Dave Clark Five, The Rolling Stones, Lesley Gore, The Monkees, The Archies. The closest I got to Pitney was second-hand, via The Royal Guardsmen's cover of "Liberty Valance" on the Snoopy Vs. The Red Baron album in 1967. I was in first grade by then. No need for a worldly first-grader to concern himself with the practically prehistoric sounds that walked the earth in the years before kindergarten.

My rediscovery and expanded appreciation of '60s music occurred when I was an adolescent and teenager in the '70s. Pitney wasn't necessarily high on my list of acts I needed to embrace and exalt immediately, but I got there in due time. Nonetheless, I always had a sense that Pitney was inherently...I dunno, worthy, special among pre-Beatles pop idols, neither a Frankie nor a Fabian, not an interchangeable poster boy, but real, essential, substantial. I couldn't have articulated any of that, but it was nonetheless something I knew.

A plank on my road back to Gene Pitney appeared when I was flipping channels on cable one day in the mid '70s, and I stumbled across Town Without Pity, a gritty 1961 film that opens with Gene Pitney's familiar title tune. Connection. Pitney's swing and swagger both contrasted and complemented the movie's grim tone; my ears were open. I don't think I found much to read about Pitney among the rock 'n' roll histories I was absorbing at the time; I eventually pieced together that he wrote "He's A Rebel" for The Crystals (in addition to penning Ricky Nelson's "Hello Mary Lou"), and I sought out the sound of Gene Pitney with my new best friend: oldies radio.

Oldies radio gave me "It Hurts To Be In Love." That became my favorite. As I finally grew old enough to visit bars and guzzle beer and badger DJs for songs to play while I didn't dance with any of the pretty girls there, an oldies bar called The Tip-A-Few became a favored hangout, and "It Hurts To Be In Love" became a favored request. I was well on my way to becoming a Gene Pitney fan.

I still had a long way to go yet. I remember a late '70s trip to Shoppingtown Mall, my Dad waiting in the car while I ran in to accomplish some errand. I stopped to flirt with a girl I knew from school, and I stopped in the record store to flip through 99-cent cutouts. I picked up a couple of these under-a-buck treasures--the eponymous debut by The Real Kids, and the obnoxious noise classic The Residents Present The Third Reich 'n' Roll--but I passed up on a 2-LP set of the best of Gene Pitney. That was a decision I regretted immediately!



(I also recall visiting my girlfriend Brenda on Staten Island in the early '80s, and watching a band called Blue Angel on TV as they performed a terrific cover of Pitney's "I'm Gonna Be Strong." Blue Angel's lead singer was named Cyndi Lauper; we'd hear more from her before long.)

I don't remember my actual first Gene Pitney acquisition. That family copy of World-Wide Winners was long gone, so I think my own Pitney collection began with either a used single-album best-of LP or a truly beat-up copy of Only Love Can Break A Heart; don't know where or when I snagged the former, but I definitely grabbed the latter out of the Get These GONE! bin at Gary Sperrazza!'s store Apollo Records in Buffalo in the early/mid '80s.



By the time Brenda and I moved back to Syracuse in the late '80s, my appreciation of Gene Pitney had matured and blossomed. We had a chance to see Pitney live at the State Fair in '88 or so, and I knew we couldn't miss that. My sister accompanied us to that great show--full circle!



There was never a time when I didn't know at least some of Gene Pitney's music, no such thing as a period in my life where Pitney's music wasn't at least some small cherished part of the jumbled jukebox that plays within my easily-turned head. The old favorites remained favorites: "Town Without Pity;" "(The Man Who Shot) Liberty Valance;" "Half Heaven Half Heartache;" "I'm Gonna Love My Life Away." I discovered new favorites: "It Hurts To Be In Love;" "Last Chance To Turn Around;" "She's A Heartbreaker;" "I'm Gonna Be Strong." But ultimately it was a track on that World-Wide Winners album, a track I never paid attention to as a child, which became my go-to Pitney track: "Twenty Four Hours From Tulsa."

Let me reprise something I wrote long ago about this unbelievable record: On paper, it's tough to sympathize with a ne'er-do-well who ups and ditches his long-time love because he runs into some hinge-heeled floozy when he's a mere day's travel away from home and hearth.  Good thing we don't enjoy records on paper.  This record is perfect in every respect, from Pitney's authoritative vocals through every small musical nuance of this incredible Bacharach-David number. The only thing I'll add now is that Gene Pitney's "Twenty Four Hours From Tulsa" is The Greatest Record Ever Made.

Gene Pitney was inducted into The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame in 2002, an overdue recognition, though I was at least pleased to see Pitney inducted alongside my heroes The Ramones. He passed away in 2006. His music is with me forever. It always has been.



Quick Takes For P:

PEZBAND



"Spakling Power Pop!" While it might seem unlikely that I could possibly resist that specific hype in the late '70s, the truth is that I didn't really get Pezband at the time. I think I picked up the Laughing At The Pieces album on a trip to Cleveland, and I may have purchased Cover To Cover somewhere in that time frame, but neither moved me, so I traded 'em in. Fast-forward to the early '90s, and it suddenly dawned on me that I needed Pezband records, so I tracked down each and every one of the band's releases. "Love Goes Underground" and "Stop! Wait A Minute" are my favorites.

THE PENETRATORS



I probably read about this band billed as "Syracuse's Only!" in the pages of our local punk/new wave fanzine Poser in 1979, before I ever heard their music. I bought their debut 45 "Gotta Have Her"/"Baby Don'tcha Tell Me," and loved it (particularly the B-side); I liked the follow-up, "Teenage Lifestyle," even more. Years later, I wrote the liner notes to a Penetrators live album, and to a solo EP by Penetrators lead singer Jack Lipton; I never had an opportunity to see the band play live.

WHEN THE EVERLASTING FIRST RETURNS:

P is for




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You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Our new compilation CD This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio, Volume 4 is now available from Kool Kat Musik! 29 tracks of irresistible rockin' pop, starring Pop Co-OpRay PaulCirce Link & Christian NesmithVegas With Randolph Featuring Lannie FlowersThe SlapbacksP. HuxIrene PeñaMichael Oliver & the Sacred Band Featuring Dave MerrittThe RubinoosStepford KnivesThe Grip WeedsPopdudesRonnie DarkThe Flashcubes,Chris von SneidernThe Bottle Kids1.4.5.The SmithereensPaul Collins' BeatThe Hit SquadThe RulersThe Legal MattersMaura & the Bright LightsLisa Mychols, and Mr. Encrypto & the Cyphers. You gotta have it, so order it here.



Wednesday, November 15, 2017

THIS IS ROCK 'N' ROLL RADIO Flashback: The First Edition Of THE MAGNIFICENT SIX



This Sunday, November 19th, This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl returns to the concept of THE MAGNIFICENT SIX, as we devote the entirety of our three-hour show to the music of six Featured Acts. This edition of The Magnificent Six will be all about Circe Link, The Easybeats, The Spinners, The Jam, Cocktail Slippers, and The Clash, and we hope listeners will find an intoxicatin' 'n' irresistible mix of familiar great stuff stuff they already love and newly-introduced great stuff they'll love just as much in the future. You can join us Sunday from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at Spark 103.3 and 93.7 WSPJ-LP, and on the web at sparksyracuse.org





We've only done The Magnificent Six once before, way back on August 8th, 2013. That inaugural edition of The Magnificent Six starred The PretendersMichael Nesmith, The Bevis Frond, Lyres, Big Star, and Rachael Gordon. Part of my specific motivation then was to promote Rachael Gordon, whose music I was flipping out over at the time, and I was looking to lure more recruits to the Rachael Gordon Army. For M6 2017, I hope to introduce folks to more of the magic of Circe Link, whose pop tunes with Christian Nesmith deserve saturation airplay on every station across the globe.  We'll do our part Sunday.

Meanwhile, here's a look back at that first M6 from 2013.

This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl, Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse on The Spark WSPJ-LP 103.3 and 93.7, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/

Spark Syracuse is supported by listeners like you. Tax-deductible donations  are welcome at http://sparksyracuse.org/support/

You can follow Carl's daily blog Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do) at 
https://carlcafarelli.blogspot.com/

Our new compilation CD This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio, Volume 4 is now available from Kool Kat Musik! 29 tracks of irresistible rockin' pop, starring Pop Co-OpRay PaulCirce Link & Christian NesmithVegas With Randolph Featuring Lannie FlowersThe SlapbacksP. HuxIrene PeñaMichael Oliver & the Sacred Band Featuring Dave MerrittThe RubinoosStepford KnivesThe Grip WeedsPopdudesRonnie DarkThe FlashcubesChris von SneidernThe Bottle Kids1.4.5.The SmithereensPaul Collins' BeatThe Hit SquadThe RulersThe Legal MattersMaura & the Bright LightsLisa Mychols, and Mr. Encrypto & the Cyphers. You gotta have it, so order it here.





This week's edition of This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl cast its dim widdle spotlight on THE MAGNIFICENT SIX, a catchy title we concocted for a show devoted exclusively to the music of six Featured Acts: BIG STAR, MICHAEL NESMITH, THE BEVIS FROND, THE LYRES, THE PRETENDERS, and RACHAEL GORDON. While it's a safe bet that most of the TIRnRR Faithful are at least somewhat familiar with those first five acts, it's likely that fewer have heard Rachael Gordon, and that's a shame. Rachael Gordon's wonderful 2002 album The Coming Of Spring is the best album of the 2000s that no ones knows about, and it certainly wouldn't break our hearts if playing her stuff alongside these other pop greats inspires listeners to add some Rachael Gordon to their day. The Coming Of Spring is still available as a digital download from iTunes and Amazon; she also released an anthology (with little overlap) called Rock 'n' Roll Girl, which is a Japanese import (and priced accordingly), but really, really swell. Rachael's been concentrating more on classic country singing of late, and fans in the land Down Under can catch her at the Woodford Festival in Australia after Christmas. She says she's also thinking of doing another pop album; Dana & Carl approve that message, and it was a delight to play a few of her existing pop records alongside those of some other artists we love. I tell ya, this radio thing is just the best gig EVER.

NEXT WEEK: on August 18th, bring your hankies for the final scheduled edition of THE MEGHAN & CARL SHOW, as daddy and daughter match wits and record collections one last time before the nest empties. IN TWO WEEKS: on August 25th, bring your skinny ties for THE MANY MOODS OF DANA BONN, as Dana plays a few of his New Wave faves. IN THREE WEEKS: on September 1st, bring your Black Vinyl Records, as we feature the music of SHOES, and welcome author Mary Donnelly, who'll discuss her new book, Boys Don't Lie: A History Of ShoesIN FOUR WEEKS: on September 8th, bring your own beer, as we let Guest Programmer Beth Woodell take over, and yeah, that's reason enough right there! And this is what rock 'n' roll radio sounded like with THE MAGNIFICENT SIX on a Sunday night in Syracuse this week.

This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl streams live every Sunday night from 9 to Midnight Eastern, exclusively at www.westcottradio.org.

TIRnRR # 686:  8/11/13

BIG STAR:  "In The Street" (Big Beat, VA:  Thank You, Friends)
--
RACHAEL GORDON:  "Break My Heart" (Sounds Of Subterrania, The Coming Of Spring)
THE PRETENDERS:  "Tattooed Love Boys" (Sire, Pretenders)
MICHAEL NESMITH:  "I Am Not That" (Pacific Arts, ...tropical campfire's...)
THE BEVIS FROND:  "I Can't Get Into Your Scene" (Rubric, Bevis Through The Looking Glass)
THE LYRES [with STIV BATORS]:  "Here's A Heart" (Matador, A Promise Is A Promise)
BIG STAR:  "Thirteen [alternate mix, 1972]" (Omnivore, Nothing Can Hurt Me)
--
THE LYRES:  "Love Me Till The Sun Shines" (Matador, On Fyre)
THE BEVIS FROND:  "He'd Be A Diamond" (Rubric, New River Head)
RACHAEL GORDON:  "Drop By And Stay" (Sounds Of Subterrania, The Coming Of Spring)
THE PRETENDERS:  "Cuban Slide" (Sire, Pretenders)
MICHAEL NESMITH:  "Light" (Rhino, The Newer Stuff)
BIG STAR:  "The India Song [live]" (Rhino, Keep An Eye On The Sky)
--
MICHAEL NESMITH & THE FIRST NATIONAL BAND:  "Nine Times Blue/Little Red Rider" (Pacific Arts, Complete)
BIG STAR:  "Way Out West [alternate mix, 1972]" (Omnivore, Nothing Can Hurt Me)
THE LYRES:  "You Won't Be Sad Anymore" (Matador, Lyres Lyres)
THE PRETENDERS:  "Time The Avenger" (Sire, Learning To Crawl)
RACHAEL GORDON:  "Man's Best Friend" (Wizzard In Vinyl, Rock And Roll Girl)
THE BEVIS FROND:  "Star Burn Out" (Flydaddy, North Circular)
--
RACHAEL GORDON:  "Fun At Your House" (Sounds Of Subterrania, The Coming Of Spring)
THE PRETENDERS:  "Message Of Love" (Sire, Pretenders II)
MICHAEL NESMITH & THE FIRST NATIONAL BAND:  "Some Of Shelly's Blues" (Rhino, The Older Stuff)
THE BEVIS FROND:  "And Now She's Mine [demo]" (Rubric, London Stone)
THE LYRES:  "But If You're Happy" (Taang!, Happy Now)
BIG STAR:  "Thank You Friends" (Rykodisc, Third/Sister Lovers)
--
MICHAEL NESMITH:  "Rising In Love" (Pacific Arts, ...tropical campfire's...)
BIG STAR:  "My Life Is Right" (Ardent, # 1 Record/Radio City)
RACHAEL GORDON:  "You Got It" (Sounds Of Subterrania, The Coming Of Spring)
THE PRETENDERS:  "Middle Of The Road" (Sire, Learning To Crawl)
THE LYRES:  "Don't Give It Up Now" (Matador, On Fyre)
THE BEVIS FROND:  "Now You Know" (Rubric, Bevis Through The Looking Glass)
--
RACHAEL GORDON:  "Rock And Roll Girl" (Wizzard In Vinyl, Rock 'n' Roll Girl)
THE PRETENDERS:  "Kid" (Sire, Pretenders)
MICHAEL NESMITH & THE FIRST NATIONAL BAND:  "Propinquity (I've Just Begun To Care)" (Rhino, The Older Stuff)
THE BEVIS FROND:  "Son Of Many Mothers" (Rubric, New River Head)
THE LYRES:  "Buried Alive" (Matador, AHS 1005)
BIG STAR:  "She's A Mover" (Rykodisc, Live)
--
THE LYRES:  "I'll Try Anyway" (Matador, On Fyre)
THE BEVIS FROND:  "More To This Than That" (Woronzow, The Leaving Of London)
RACHAEL GORDON:  "Dresden Station" (Sounds Of Subterrania, The Coming Of Spring)
THE PRETENDERS:  "Day After Day" (Sire, Pretenders II)
MICHAEL NESMITH & THE FIRST NATIONAL BAND:  "Silver Moon" (Rhino, The Older Stuff)
BIG STAR:  "I'm In Love With A Girl" (Rhino, Keep An Eye On The Sky)
RACHAEL GORDON:  "Ariel" (sounds Of Subterrania, The Coming Of Spring)
THE BEVIS FROND:  "This One" (Woronzow, White Numbers)
MICHAEL NESMITH & THE FIRST NATIONAL BAND:  "Joanne" (Rhino, The Older Stuff)
THE PRETENDERS:  "Talk Of The Town" (Sire, Singles)
THE LYRES:  "Help You Ann" (Matador, On Fyre)
THE BEVIS FROND:  "Beautiful To Me" (Woronzow, White Numbers)
RACHAEL GORDON:  "Where Are You Tonight" (Sounds Of Subterrania, The Coming Of Spring)
BIG STAR:  "September Gurls" (Big Beat, VA:  Thank You, Friends)
MICHAEL NESMITH & THE FIRST NATIONAL BAND:  "1st National Dance" (Camden International, Magnetic South/Loose Salute)

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Dell's SUPER HEROES # 2




From 1967, here's the second issue of Super Heroes starring The Fab Four, Dell Comics' short-lived attempt to cash in on the sudden popularity of superheroes in the aftermath of Batman's smash success on TV.  You can read Super Heroes # 1 here. The cover blurb for this issue says it all: "America's Greatest Super Heroes battle The Clown...Mr. Mutt...and Johnny Boom-Boom all in this super issue!" One suspects this dastardly lot will never quite compete with The Joker, Dr. Doom, or even Paste-Pot Pete, and The Clown is corrected to a plural on the first page. But why quibble? It's SUPERHEROES! In the parlance of '67: POW! ZONK! BIFF!

The Fab Four is believed to be an orphaned property, no longer under copyright. The Fab Four appear in new adventures in the pages of Popular Comics, published by InDELLible Comics. You can see El, Hy, Polly, and Crispy (among others) right on the cover.



TIP THE BLOGGER: CC's Tip Jar!

You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Our new compilation CD This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio, Volume 4 is now available from Kool Kat Musik! 29 tracks of irresistible rockin' pop, starring Pop Co-OpRay PaulCirce Link & Christian NesmithVegas With Randolph Featuring Lannie FlowersThe SlapbacksP. HuxIrene PeñaMichael Oliver & the Sacred Band Featuring Dave MerrittThe RubinoosStepford KnivesThe Grip WeedsPopdudesRonnie DarkThe Flashcubes,Chris von SneidernThe Bottle Kids1.4.5.The SmithereensPaul Collins' BeatThe Hit SquadThe RulersThe Legal MattersMaura & the Bright LightsLisa Mychols, and Mr. Encrypto & the Cyphers. You gotta have it, so order it here.

And now: Super Heroes # 2!