Sunday, April 11, 2021

Tonight On THIS IS ROCK 'N' ROLL RADIO

Buddy Holly from the '50s. Aretha Franklin from the '60s. The Who from the '70s. The Bangles from the '80s. The Muffs from the '90s. The Beards from the '00s. The Monkees from the '10s. Leslie Odom, Jr. from our current, slightly used decade. Brand new music from The Legal Matters, Beebe Gallini, Ken Sharp, John Flynn, Andrea Gillis, and Barry Lee and the Mystic Arrows. An as-yet-unreleased 1979 live track from The Flashcubes. And that's just a sample of the sounds from then and now that occupy this week's exercise in The Best Three Hours Of Radio On The Whole Friggin' Planet. Your calendar has no meaning here. All that matters is tonight. Sunday night, 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FMhttp://sparksyracuse.org/

Saturday, April 10, 2021

POP-A-LOOZA: Comic Book Retroview: BATMAN # 180

Each week, the pop culture website Pop-A-Looza shares some posts from my vast 'n' captivating Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do) archives. The latest shared post is my Comic Book Retroview look back at a comic book published in 1966, Batman # 180.

As its intro says, this piece was originally written as a (rejected) spec submission to Comics Buyer's Guide in the '80s. I'm not sure exactly when I actually wrote and submitted it--that was an awful lot of '80s fried eggs ago--but I'm pretty sure it was after I'd already sold a retrospective of the '60s Batman TV series to CBG editors Don and Maggie Thompson for use in a magazine called Comics Collector in 1985. Both CBG and Comics Collector were published by Krause Publications in Iola, Wisconsin; Krause also published the record collectors' tabloid Goldmine, and I betcha this celebration of Batman # 180 was written after I began freelancing for Goldmine in 1986. The Goldmine affiliation lasted twenty years, and is a large part of whatever notoriety I managed to establish as a rockin' pop pundit. That story is told in some detail in The Road To Goldmine, which is likely my favorite of all the things I've written for this blog.

Before writin' about records for Goldmine, and even before chronicling Batman's on-screen BIFFs, BAMs, and POWs for Comic Collector, my first freelance writing sales were to a magazine called Amazing Heroes, starting in 1984. A previous post talked about my short history with Amazing Heroes, and I've reprised a couple of my AH pieces here: a history of DC's '60s espionage series The Secret Six and an A-Z romp through some obscure DC characters, "Who's...WHO?!" 

But enough about me. Let's talk about Batman! A Comic Book Retroview celebration of Batman # 180 gives us the latest Boppin' Pop-A-Looza.

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You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Hey! If you buy from Amazon, consider making your purchases through links at Pop-A-Looza. A portion of your purchase there will go to support Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do). Thinking Amazon? Think Pop-A-Looza.

This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl airs Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read about our history here.

The many fine This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio compilation albums are still available, each full of that rockin' pop sound you crave. A portion of all sales benefit our perpetually cash-strapped community radio project:


Volume 1: download

Volume 2: CD or download
Volume 3: download
Volume 4: CD or download
Waterloo Sunset--Benefit For This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio:  CD or download

I'm on Twitter @CafarelliCarl.

Friday, April 9, 2021

THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE: Thank You, Girl


I put this piece together as a potential chapter for my (clearly imaginary) book The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1), but it is not included in the book's current blueprint. That may change, but for now, it's a blog piece instead.

(And, considering the parts-is-parts manner in which Capitol Records cobbled together the American versions of The Beatles' early LPs, it's fitting that this chapter was itself stitched together from sections contained within two previous posts. Waste not, want not.)

An infinite number of songs can each be THE greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. Today, this is THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE!


THE BEATLES: Thank You, Girl
Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
Produced by George Martin
Original release: Single (B-side of "From Me To You"), Parlophone Records [U.K.], 1963
GREM! mix: From the album The Beatles' Second Album, Capitol Records, 1964

Americans old enough to meet The Beatles' records in the '60s (or even for a good while thereafter) were introduced to this forever fab sound via U.S. label Capitol Records' much-maligned and possibly Philistine muckin' about with the original British tracks. The American LPs were shorter than their nearest U.K. counterparts, there were consequently more Beatles albums released here than in Her Majesty's domain, and a lot of the tracks were tweaked and meddled with by Yankee hands indifferent to the intent of The Beatles and their producer, George Martin. One could imagine an American record producer chomping on a cigar and shrugging off criticism of such crass creative butchery: It's not ART ferchrissakes, it's a freakin' pop record! Jeez, it's for kids who don't know any better; otherwise they'd listen to something good instead. But until they grow up outta this Beatle nonsense, WE know what the American kids wanna hear!

Philistines? Yeah Yeah Yeah. But I remain adamantly devoted to The Beatles' American LPs. It's how we heard The Beatles, how we fell in love with The Beatles. My Rubber Soul is the American Rubber Soul, the one that inspired Brian Wilson to create Pet Sounds. My two all-time favorite albums are the U.S. patchworks Beatles '65 and Beatles VI. I prefer Meet The Beatles to With The Beatles. I recognize the purity of the British originals. I can't and won't shake my affection for the records that made me.


For all the (sometimes deserved) crap hurled at Capitol Records' somewhat ham-handed treatment of The Beatles' records before Sgt. Pepper, "Thank You, Girl" is one shining example of Capitol taking a fab song and making it better. The original U.K. version of this track is fine. But the U.S. version, on Capitol's money-grabbing hodgepodge LP The Beatles' Second Album? Man, that track explodes with more energy than even virgin vinyl can carry, adding extra harmonica parts, absolutely superfluous (yet paradoxically essential) echo, and a full-volume, full-throttle atmosphere that could be seen as over-the-top if weren't so exactly, unerringly right. There are days when this is The Greatest Record Ever Made. And there are certainly occasional evening commutes when this is the only song worth playing, over and over, making me glad when I was blue.

The American mix of "Thank You, Girl" is better than the U.K. version. It's not even close. I remember the first time I heard the British "Thank You, Girl." I was in high school, spring of '77, and I bought an import reissue of The Beatles' Hits EP, specifically to own a copy of "Thank You, Girl," a track I knew and loved from my cousin Maryann's copy of The Beatles' Second Album. And I was so disappointed with the relatively lifeless mix on the EP. AND IT HAD LESS HARMONICA! Heresy! Sure, it turned out to be heresy in reverse, I guess, but no matter. I knew which version moved me. I still do. I chalked it off to experience, and snagged a beat-up copy of The Beatles' Second Album at the flea market. And all I've gotta do is thank you, Capitol. Thank you, Capitol.

TIP THE BLOGGER: CC's Tip Jar!

You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Hey! If you buy from Amazon, consider making your purchases through links at Pop-A-Looza. A portion of your purchase there will go to support Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do). Thinking Amazon? Think Pop-A-Looza.

This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl airs Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read about our history here.

The many fine This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio compilation albums are still available, each full of that rockin' pop sound you crave. A portion of all sales benefit our perpetually cash-strapped community radio project:


Volume 1: download

Volume 2: CD or download
Volume 3: download
Volume 4: CD or download
Waterloo Sunset--Benefit For This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio:  CD or download

I'm on Twitter @CafarelliCarl.

Thursday, April 8, 2021

MY WEEKLY VIDEO BLOG: THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE! # 25: Aretha Franklin, "Respect"

An infinite number of songs can each be THE greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. I like that idea so much I'm writing a book about it. And I'm promoting that book with a weekly video series, discussing each of the book's chosen tracks one by one.

Since Brenda and I just watched the eight-part National Geographic mini-series biopic about Aretha Franklin, it seems an obvious choice this week to flip my book's pages to the chapter about the Queen of Soul and her definitive rendition of Otis Redding's "Respect." I know you know the song; if you don't, well, I guess that's evidence of life on other planets. But yeah, of course you know it, and you can spell it: R-E-S-P-E-C-T. Nonetheless, GREM! protocol requires me to link the song here, and then invite you to witness my rant on its behalf:

If you dig whatever the hell it is I'm doing in these weekly videos, please subscribe to my YouTube channelNEXT WEEK: we'll be back with more from The Greatest Record Ever Made!

THIS WEEK'S VIDEO: Aretha Franklin, "Respect"

GREM! # 24: Pink Floyd, "Wish You Were Here"

GREM! # 23: The Carpenters, "Only Yesterday" and Material Issue, "Kim The Waitress"

GREM! # 22: The Beatles,"Yesterday"

GREM! # 21: The Bay City Rollers, "Rock And Roll Love Letter"

GREM! # 20: Buddy Holly, "Peggy Sue"/"Everyday"

GREM! # 19: The Monkees, "The Girl I Knew Somewhere"

GREM! # 18: Melanie with the Edwin Hawking Singers, "Lay Down (Candles In The Rain)"

GREM! # 17: The Romantics, "What I Like About You"

GREM! # 16: The Hollies, "I Can't Let Go"

GREM! # 14: Crazy Elephant, "Gimme Gimme Good Lovin'"

GREM! # 13: Neil Diamond, "Brother Love's Traveling Salvation Show"

GREM! # 12: Little Richard, "The Girl Can't Help It"

GREM! # 11: Eytan Mirsky, "This Year's Gonna Be Our Year"

GREM! # 10: The Monkees, "Riu Chiu"

GREM! # 9: Patti Smith, "Gloria"

GREM! # 8: Big Mama Thornton, "Hound Dog"

GREM! # 7: Elvis Presley, "Heartbreak Hotel"

GREM! # 6The Sex Pistols,"God Save The Queen"

GREM! # 5: Dusty Springfield,"I Only Want To Be With You"

GREM! # 4: Chuck Berry, "Promised Land"

GREM! # 3: Baron Daemon and the Vampires, "The TransylvaniaTwist"

GREM! # 2: Badfinger, "Baby Blue"

GREM! # 1: The Ramones, "Do You Remember Rock 'n' Roll Radio?

TIP THE BLOGGER: CC's Tip Jar!

You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Hey! If you buy from Amazon, consider making your purchases through links at Pop-A-Looza. A portion of your purchase there will go to support Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do). Thinking Amazon? Think Pop-A-Looza.

This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl airs Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read about our history here.

The many fine This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio compilation albums are still available, each full of that rockin' pop sound you crave. A portion of all sales benefit our perpetually cash-strapped community radio project:


Volume 1: download

Volume 2: CD or download
Volume 3: download
Volume 4: CD or download
Waterloo Sunset--Benefit For This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio:  CD or download

I'm on Twitter @CafarelliCarl.

Wednesday, April 7, 2021

POP-A-LOOZA: Lights! Camera! REACTION! My Life At The Movies: Rock 'n' Roll!

Each week, the pop culture website Pop-A-Looza shares some posts from my vast 'n' captivating Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do) archives. The latest shared post is a Lights! Camera! REACTION! look at rock 'n' roll movies.

This piece was written in 2018, and I haven't added much to my rock 'n' roll flick ticket stub gallery since then. We talked about the Herman's Hermits pastiche Ripped! in our last Boppin' Pop-A-Looza; I also saw Times Square and Earth, Wind & Fire in That's The Way Of The World, neither of which is exactly Casablanca, nor even Beyond The Valley Of The Dolls. I did pick up a DVD copy of Gerry and the Pacemakers in Ferry Cross The Mersey, and I'm looking forward to watching it. 

I'm surprised my original piece didn't mention Prince, Morris Day, and Apollonia in Purple Rain, a movie I certainly enjoyed in its original 1984 theatrical run. That's a pretty big omission, and it stuck out immediately when I re-read the piece this week. Oops? This is what it sounds like when bloggers cry.

I also omitted Detroit Rock City, an inessential but fun 1999 jukebox movie about KISS fans in the '70s. Detroit Rock City was an authorized KISS project, but the band only appeared in a climactic in-concert cameo, allowing, y'know, actual actors to carry the day. The result was silly and inconsequential, and I liked it a lot more than the lackluster 1978 TV movie KISS Meets The Phantom Of The Park

I'm sure I forgot others that should have been cited in the original article, but I regret forgetting about Detroit Rock City and especially Purple Rain. I betcha I'll regret others as I remember them. But omissions notwithstanding, it's still a decent piece about my love of rock 'n' roll movies. "Lights! Camera! REACTION! My Life At The Movies: Rock 'n' Roll!" serves as the latest Boppin' Pop-A-Looza.

TIP THE BLOGGER: CC's Tip Jar!

You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Hey! If you buy from Amazon, consider making your purchases through links at Pop-A-Looza. A portion of your purchase there will go to support Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do). Thinking Amazon? Think Pop-A-Looza.


This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl airs Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read about our history here.


The many fine This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio compilation albums are still available, each full of that rockin' pop sound you crave. A portion of all sales benefit our perpetually cash-strapped community radio project:


Volume 1: download

Volume 2: CD or download
Volume 3: download
Volume 4: CD or download

Waterloo Sunset--Benefit For This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio:  CD or download

Follow me on Twitter @CafarelliCarl

Tuesday, April 6, 2021

10 SONGS: 4/6/2021

10 Songs is a weekly list of ten songs that happen to be on my mind at the moment. Given my intention to usually write these on Mondays, the lists are often dominated by songs played on the previous night's edition of This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl. The idea was inspired by Don Valentine of the essential blog I Don't Hear A Single.


This week's edition of 10 Songs draws exclusively from the playlist for This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio # 1071.

THE ARMOIRES: Great Distances


It turns out that The Armoires have been lying to us. Naughty Armoires! Who's been messing up everything? It's been Armoires all along. 


They're insidious. So perfidious!

Actually, we admire their ingenuity. For the last year and a half, The Armoires released a total of eight singles under various fabricated
noms du bop. October Surprise! The Ceramic Age! D.F.E.! Zed Cats! The Chessie System! The YES IT IS! Tina and the Tiny Potatoes! And yes, even Gospel Swamps, the presumed wunderkinder behind recent TIRnRR Pick Hit "Great Distances." Each of these combos du jour was, in reality, The Armoires incognito.

And Incognito is the title of The Armoires' new album, collecting all this backward masquing under one roof. It's EIGHT bands for the price of one, plus bonus stuff, too. We played The YES IT IS...er, The Armoires' Incognito cover of XTC's "Senses Working Overtime" on this week's show. And we played "Great Distances" again, too. Listen, man: a hit's a hit, no matter the name above the title.

ROBERTA FLACK: Killing Me Softly With His Song


An infinite number of songs can each be THE greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. As I've been acknowledging the many roadblocks facing my long-threatened book The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1), I've taken the seemingly counterintuitive step of expanding its proposed Table of Contents rather than shortening it. The book's last posted update promised 165 songs, each one taking its own infinite turn; the book's ToC now stands at a total of 205 songs, comprised of 200 song chapters plus five bonus tracks (Overture, Entr'acte, Encore!, Encore!!, and Coda). I'm still deliberately excluding several songs that are among my all-time poppermost toppermost (by The Animals, The Vogues, The Yardbirds, The Plimsouls, The Beau Brummels, and more), just to try to tell a larger story with a few different selections. 

Roberta Flack's 1973 hit "Killing Me Softly With His Song" is among the tracks I've added to the book. Its haunting mix of smooth 'n' silky delivery and an exposed vulnerability bordering on the outer suburbs of paranoia made it an unforgettable component of my prime AM radio-listening era. 

MARVIN GAYE: I Heard It Through The Grapevine


On the other hand, Marvin Gaye's Motown classic "I Heard It Through The Grapevine" has been an integral part of the GREM! book for quite a while. That chapter includes an account of my unique introduction to the song:

"...There may be some incongruous symmetry in the fact that my first recollection of Marvin Gaye's swaying soul juggernaut 'I Heard It Through The Grapevine'--a song that offers as painful and as piercing a portrait of infidelity and helpless anger as any primal scream to ever top the pop chart--was delivered in a public service television commercial on behalf of venereal disease awareness. It was a far cry from its later use in 1980s commercials for California raisins, lemme tell ya.

"Marvin Gaye's own collection of contradictions seems suited to that sort of odd juxtaposition. Gaye could in turns be smooth supper-club crooner, R & B dynamo, 
amiable pop juggernaut, progressive black power avatar, horny devil, envelope pusher, mainstream star, and sweet soul personified. Calling him a chameleon does disservice to his legacy; he was versatile, he was accomplished, and he was one of the greatest talents ever to grace the grooves of a 45. His duets (with Tammi Terrell or Kim Weston) are the essence of 1960s radio-ready pop music. Both 'What's Going On' and 'Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)' serve the disparate needs of social commentary and slow dancing. His earnest pleas for gettin' some, from 'Let's Get It On' to 'Sexual Healing,' epitomize consensual seduction. 'Ain't That Peculiar' just sounds' y'know,  awesome.

"And, for all that, 'I Heard It Through The Grapevine' stands as the definitive Marvin Gaye track...."

HUMAN SWITCHBOARD: (Say No To) Saturday's Girl


In our pop songs, some lines cut with deliberate precision, evoking a gnawing ache that echoes the desperation of watching helplessly as love slips away.
I loved you, well...never mind in Big Star's "September Gurls" is an example. They say a heart's not quite a heart until it's been broken in Human Switchboard's "(Say No To) Saturday's Girl" is another. 


"(Say No To) Saturday's Girl" is the lead-off track on the group's 1981 album
Who's Landing In My Hangar? It was the third Human Switchboard track I ever heard, one of two tracks on a Human Switchboard flexi-disc put out by Trouser Press magazine. A few years before that, "Your Much Madder Than Me" was my introduction to Human Switchboard, courtesy of its appearance on a 1978 sampler album called Waves Vol. 1, which also featured Syracuse's own power pop powerhouse The Flashcubes, plus 20/20, The Romantics, The Last, Paul Collins and more. Although the band was based in guitarist Bob Pfeifer's home state of Ohio, Pfeifer and keyboardist Myrna Marcarian first met at Syracuse University. Myrna, at least, still had ties to Syracuse after that, since I remember seeing her a time or two at Desert Shore Records up on the SU hill in the late '70s. I recall speaking to her once, complimenting her on "You're Much Madder Than Me" when the store's owner introduced us. (How he knew who I was is a mystery lost to memory. And beer.)

"You're Much Madder Than Me" didn't compare me for the magnificent melancholy of "Saturday's Girl." Written by Pfeifer and Marcarian, sung with quiet dignity by Marcarian, the track just burns with sadmaking and regret. 

They say a heart's not quite a heart until it's been broken. I think we've all been there. 

KID GULLIVER: Boy In A Bubble


This little mutant radio show has a number of basic credos and go-to procedures in place: radio's job is to sell records; any record you ain't heard is a new record; great records don't care what year it is; it's ALL pop music; and more!  One lesser-known element of TIRnRR's SOP is when certain acts release a new song, we play that song at our first opportunity. 

And so it is in this case. Kid Gulliver releases a new single, we play that single. Rules are rules, man.

THE MONKEES: Pleasant Valley Sunday


"Pleasant Valley Sunday" is one of only two of
The Monkees' U.S. hit A-sides to feature all four of The Monkees. Micky Dolenz, Davy Jones, Peter Tork, and Michael Nesmith are also all present and accounted for on "Daydream Believer," as well as on the charting B-side "The Girl I Knew Somewhere," and on the British hit "Alternate Title" (aka "Randy Scouse Git" here in the States, where neither it nor any of its fellow Headquarters LP tracks made it to a 45). Here's what I wrote about "Pleasant Valley Sunday" in a piece celebrating my 25 favorite Monkees tracks:

"If we had to pick one track to represent The Monkees, my choice would be 'Pleasant Valley Sunday, the second best song that Gerry Goffin and Carole King wrote for the group. "Pleasant Valley Sunday" is the definitive Monkees track, with a mix of contributions from The Monkees themselves and their studio pals--Micky on the lead vocal (with Davy and Michael singin' along), Michael on electric guitar, Peter on piano, Davy on percussion, plus [bassist] Chip Douglas, [drummer] 'Fast' Eddie Hoh, and Bill Chadwick (the latter on acoustic guitar)--performing a track from one of Don Kirshner's favorite songwriting teams, but all engaged in the track to a degree and in a manner that could not have been possible when Kirshner was in charge. Some have condemned the lyrics as too pat and predictable in their dismissal of suburban values, and there's some merit in that criticism. It doesn't matter. The song is perfect, the performance is pristine. The local rock group down the street is working hard to learn their song...and succeeding in that effort beyond anyone's wildest dream."

The other Goffin-King song referenced above is "Porpoise Song (Theme From Head)," which also happens to be The Greatest Record Ever Made.

MOTT THE HOOPLE: Roll Away The Stone


Every year at this time, we have a standing request from our friend Dawn to play "Roll Away The Stone" by Mott the Hoople. Contract honored again.

OTIS REDDING: (Sittin' On) The Dock Of The Bay


Otis Redding's "(Sittin' On The) Dock Of The Bay" is another song that's been part of the GREM! book's blueprint for a good long time. But I haven't yet been able to get a handle on what I want to write about it. I had a piece started, detailing my slow discovery of Redding's music when I was a teen and twentysomething in the '70s and '80s, well after the 1967 plane crash that took Redding's life. I'm not satisfied with that plan, at least not so far. Right now, I think I'm going to take a different approach, commencing a look at Redding's career and potential future path by asking one question:

Who can say what might have been?

PHIL SEYMOUR: Let Her Dance


"Let Her Dance" was originally recorded by The Bobby Fuller Four, who scored a regional hit with it in 1965; the group's follow-up single "I Fought The Law" became their lone national breakout. Marshall Crenshaw released an able cover of "Let Her Dance" on his 1989 album Good Evening. My favorite version is this one by former Dwight Twilley Band co-star Phil Seymour, from his 1980 eponymous solo debut. But all three versions are great.

WONDERMINTS: You Need Love


Oh, this is exquisite. "You Need Love" was originally an obscure track by
The Hollies, and the prospect of covering Hollies songs is daunting indeed. The Gold Needles manage a very nice rendition of "Have You Ever Loved Somebody" on their current album What's Tomorrow Ever Done For You (as also heard on this week's TIRnRR), and near-iconic SoCal pop act Wondermints pulls off the near-impossible feat of somehow bettering The Hollies on "You Need Love." Impossible but true: over-the-top pop like no other. Wondermints know what you need. 


TIP THE BLOGGER: CC's Tip Jar!

You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Hey! If you buy from Amazon, consider making your purchases through links at Pop-A-Looza. A portion of your purchase there will go to support Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do). Thinking Amazon? Think Pop-A-Looza.


This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl airs Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read about our history here.


The many fine This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio compilation albums are still available, each full of that rockin' pop sound you crave. A portion of all sales benefit our perpetually cash-strapped community radio project:


Volume 1: download

Volume 2: CD or download
Volume 3: download
Volume 4: CD or download

Waterloo Sunset--Benefit For This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio:  CD or download

Follow me on Twitter @CafarelliCarl