Sunday, March 29, 2020

Tonight On THIS IS ROCK 'N' ROLL RADIO: A Live Stream With POP CO-OP



We're still self-quarantined. That will not stop us from bringing you new music from Pop Co-Op.

Join us tonight, March 29th, starting at 9 pm Eastern, for a live-stream record release party, celebrating Pop Co-Op's new album Factory Settings, aka Your Favorite Record Of 2020. Dana and I will chatting with the members of Pop Co-Op--Steve Stoeckel, Bruce Gordon, Joel Tinnel, and Stacy Carson--and with Keith Klingensmith of Futureman Records. We'll be playing all of the 14 tracks on Factory Settings, we'll be chatting about each one, and we're going to toss in a few Pop Co-Op bonus tracks because, let's face it, we love you. 

And Pop Co-Op loves you, too. Steve, Bruce, Joel, and Stacy will be taking questions from listeners, granting you this rare opportunity to ask the lads who they are, how they came to be, and what the hell they think they're doing here. YOU! You can be a part of this shared TIRnRR/Pop Co-Op experience, and we hope you'll join us.

It all happens tonight: Sunday, March 29th at 9 pm Eastern. You can interact with This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio's live-stream record release party with Pop Co-Op via Zoom. A splendid time is strongly implied for all. See you then!

Saturday, March 28, 2020

POP-A-LOOZA: Beat It!



Every Friday, the pop culture website Pop-A-Looza shares a post from my vast 'n' captivating Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do) archives. This week's shared post is the tale of my ongoing obsession with drumming on stuff--and drumming badly--and my current attempt to curtail this incessant urge before someone murders me to death.



I've told a few stories here and there about my ongoing wish to participate in making the music I love, and my utter inability to do so. Chief among these is "I've Got The Music In Me (And That's Where It's Going To Stay)," my chronicle of trying and failing to play a friggin' instrument. I've also written a short piece about my guitars, and a recent short story about the pop music industry, "Home Of The Hits." Speaking of drummers, there was that time back in 2003 when I asked Ringo Starr a question at a press conference, and this blog is loaded with reminiscences of the music that's captured my attention over the course of my first six decades on your charming little planet. For some overviews of those musical memories, check out My 1960s, My 1970s, and "Imagining/Remembering The Music That Played," my attempt to recreate lists of what would have been my All-Time Hot 100 songs if someone asked me (again and again) from 1976 through 1982, when I was 16 to 22 years old.

But now, we surrender to the rhythm! Or we resist surrendering to the rhythm. Or we screw up the rhythm so thoroughly our friends tell us to just beat it. It's "To Beat Or Not To Beat," this week's Boppin' Pop-A-Looza.



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You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Barring pandemics, This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl airs Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read about our history here.

The many fine This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio compilation albums are still available, each full of that rockin' pop sound you crave. A portion of all sales benefit our perpetually cash-strapped community radio project:

Volume 1: download
Volume 2: CD or download
Volume 3: download
Volume 4: CD or download
Waterloo Sunset--Benefit For This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio:  CD or download

Hey, Carl's writin' a book! The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1) will contain 124 essays about 124 tracks, each one of 'em THE greatest record ever made. An infinite number of records can each be the greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. Updated initial information can be seen here: THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE! (Volume 1).

Friday, March 27, 2020

THIS IS ROCK 'N' ROLL RADIO presents: A New Album Release Party With POP CO-OP



Sure, sure--This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio is on hiatus because of the viral cooties that have all of us sequestered 'n' ornery. That doesn't mean we're willing to skip our responsibility to serve up a release party for Factory Settings, the new album from Pop Co-Op.

Lacking our usual radio forum, we're takin' the party to Zoom for TIRnRR's first-ever interactive video edition. Dana & Carl will be joined on screen by Pop Co-Op's Steve Stoeckel, Bruce Gordon, Joel Tinnel, and Stacy Carson, plus Keith Klingensmith of the mighty, mighty Futureman Records label. We'll maintain social distance, but we'll play all fourteen tracks from this great new album, we'll throw in a few bonus tracks, and we'll talk about each fab song with the lads themselves. We'll even invite YOU--the loyal TIRnRR listener and/or Pop Co-Op fan--to participate, as the band will field questions and the rules of decorum will be largely ignored. Here's the official event description:

Sunday 3/29 at 9pm ET: a very special This is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl (normally airing on Spark Syracuse 103.3 & 93.7 FM).

Dana & Carl will interview the band and preview Factory Settings in a live broadcast interactive party using ZOOM.us. Join the Zoom to talk with the band and ask your questions. The party will also live stream on YouTube


(Hey, speaking' of YouTube: here's a little video sneak peak at Factory Settings.)


Details forthcoming, so stay tuned!

Factory Settings release date: April 1

Well, I'm sold! The album's great, this should all be more fun than a barrel full of lizards, and we hope you'll join us. Factory Settings by Pop Co-Op. Get set for Your Favorite Record Of 2020.



TIP THE BLOGGER: CC's Tip Jar!
You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Barring pandemics, This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl airs Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read about our history here.

The many fine This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio compilation albums are still available, each full of that rockin' pop sound you crave. A portion of all sales benefit our perpetually cash-strapped community radio project:

Volume 1: download
Volume 2: CD or download
Volume 3: download
Volume 4: CD or download
Waterloo Sunset--Benefit For This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio:  CD or download

Hey, Carl's writin' a book! The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1) will contain 124 essays about 124 tracks, each one of 'em THE greatest record ever made. An infinite number of records can each be the greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. Updated initial information can be seen here: THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE! (Volume 1).

Thursday, March 26, 2020

Home Of The Hits (a short story about the pop music industry)

Here's a short story I wrote last year.



HOME OF THE HITS
by Carl Cafarelli

"Good Evening, Mr. Keller."

Amber buzzed Skip Keller into the reception area at the Mephisto Records studio. Keller looked casually around this familiar environment. He'd long since lost track of how many times he'd been there, starting nearly thirty years ago, when he was a teen idol in a boy band called Hit Corps.

He wasn't a teen idol anymore, nor was he a boy. His hair was flecked with premature gray, starting to thin just a little bit on top. He still held the same guitar case he had back then, still never visited the studio without that case at his side. He visited the studio often. He didn't sing or record anymore, except as a session guy. He still wrote songs. He still made hits.  His business card read:

HITCORE
Home Of The Hits
Skip Keller
Songs And Services 

He was a company man now.

Keller smiled at Amber, skipping any pretense of flirtation. They had history, and that's what it was between them: history. "I'm here to see Willington Blue about his new album."

She replied curtly, "Mr. Wonderful is in Studio B."

Amber waived Keller in the direction he already knew. Hit Corps had recorded five Top 10 hits in Studio B. Keller had been there just last month, helping a budding young diva record the soon-to-be-hits for her Mephisto Records debut. Keller wrote two of those hits. He felt no connection to them. Decades ago, music had been a creative release for Keller. It was always a business. Business was all it was nowadays.

Willington Blue had been in a buzzworthy rock band, a critics' darling that actually sold records. Blue, the arrogant auteur, broke up that band to pursue the glory of solo superstardom. The suits at Mephisto grumbled. Those grumbles subsided when Blue's first solo album topped the charts. Grumbles resumed as work on Blue's second album stalled amid cost overruns, production delays, and the increasingly odd behavior of the tortured genius, the perfectionist, the insufferable enfant terrible Willington Blue. Mephisto Records didn't want art. Mephisto wanted a hit. And that was Skip Keller's job.

In Studio B, Blue sneered a greeting at Keller. "God's gift to aging nubiles. How's the boy band business, Keller?" Keller ignored him. "Shut up, Blue. You need to be done with this album. And you need a goddamned hit."

Blue saw red. "So Mephisto sends you, the hit man with the happy pop songs, to fit me into their cookie-cutter pop machine. Go to Hell, Fabian."

Keller shoved Blue into his seat. A trace of fear suddenly joined the scorn in Blue's eyes.

"Shut. Up. Blue." Keller held his anger in place. A professional. "I've heard your unfinished tracks. They suck. But this album needs to be finished and released now. You've made some powerful enemies...."

"Mind your own...."

"This is my business now, you idiot. Mephisto owns me. I'll never repay my studio debt, so I just do what they tell me to do. I'm going to take your session tapes, and I'm going to make them into a record, a hit record." 

Keller sighed, but without emotion. "And to do that, I don't need you."

Keller pulled his handgun and pointed it at Blue. "You need a hit. And nothing sells like a dead rock star."

Blue's eyes widened in terror. "NO...! What are you doin'? Who do think you are...?"

"I'm what you said I was, Blue." Keller fired and ended Blue's life, # 1 with a bullet.

"I'm a hitman."




TIP THE BLOGGER: CC's Tip Jar!
You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Barring pandemics, This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl airs Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read about our history here.

The many fine This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio compilation albums are still available, each full of that rockin' pop sound you crave. A portion of all sales benefit our perpetually cash-strapped community radio project:

Volume 1: download
Volume 2: CD or download
Volume 3: download
Volume 4: CD or download
Waterloo Sunset--Benefit For This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio:  CD or download

Hey, Carl's writin' a book! The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1) will contain 124 essays about 124 tracks, each one of 'em THE greatest record ever made. An infinite number of records can each be the greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. Updated initial information can be seen here: THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE! (Volume 1).

Wednesday, March 25, 2020

Pop Co-Op



It's been about three years since the release of Pop Co-Op's debut album Four State Solution. On This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl, we regularly referred to Four State Solution as "Your Favorite Record Of 2017." Recognizing that radio's job is to sell records, we tried to do our part on its behalf.

Now, Pop Co-Op is set to release their eagerly-awaited follow-up, Factory Settings. I've heard it, it's brilliant, and yes, it's Your Favorite Record Of 2020.

But radio won't be able to do its job this time, or at least our show won't. Self-quarantine has put This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio on an extended and necessary hiatus. We can't do our part to promote Factory Settings.

Or...can we?

Hmmm.

Sunday.

Stay tuned.




TIP THE BLOGGER: CC's Tip Jar!
You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Barring pandemics, This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl airs Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read about our history here.

The many fine This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio compilation albums are still available, each full of that rockin' pop sound you crave. A portion of all sales benefit our perpetually cash-strapped community radio project:

Volume 1: download
Volume 2: CD or download
Volume 3: download
Volume 4: CD or download
Waterloo Sunset--Benefit For This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio:  CD or download

Hey, Carl's writin' a book! The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1) will contain 124 essays about 124 tracks, each one of 'em THE greatest record ever made. An infinite number of records can each be the greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. Updated initial information can be seen here: THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE! (Volume 1).

Tuesday, March 24, 2020

10 SONGS: 3/24/2020

10 Songs is a weekly list of ten songs that happen to be on my mind at the moment. Given my intention to usually write these on Mondays, the lists are often dominated by songs played on the previous night's edition of This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl. The idea was inspired by Don Valentine of the essential blog I Don't Hear A Single.


There was no This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio this week, but we did have an incredible simulation. This week's edition of 10 Songs draws exclusively from the virtual playlist of This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio: Isolation Edition.

JOAN ARMATRADING: Me Myself I


I've had a complicated relationship with social interaction. Just a few years ago, I told a friend that I tend to feel out of place no matter where I am or what I'm doing. I'm a square peg, and I'm shy. I conceal it pretty well--anyone who has heard me on the radio will attest to that--and sometimes I can continue playing the role of bon vivant for short spells in real life. It's not really me, but it's the me I think I want to be. I think. I guess. I don't know.

In the early '80s, when I was a recent college graduate still living with my undergraduate girlfriend in our college town of Brockport, radio stations in Buffalo introduced me to the music of Joan Armatrading. It was probably on 97 Rock, an AOR station that aired a better'n decent Sunday night alternative show called 97 Power Rock, or it may have been WUWU-FM, the squarest peg commercial radio station I ever did hear. Either way (or both), I heard radio commercials for Armatrading's 1981 album Walk Under Ladders, and I heard a Walk Under Ladders album track called "Eating The Bear," and liked it. It took me a while to become an Armatrading fan (and I'm still but a casual fan, with her Greatest Hits CD the sole Armatrading offering in my collection), but I got there. As time went on, I became particularly taken with her songs "Drop The Pilot," "When I Get It Right," "I'm Lucky," and "Me Myself I."

"Me Myself I" is a clarion call of willful solitude. It's not who I am either, but there are times when it feels right. Damned good song, too.

ARTFUL DODGER: It's Over


By the summer of 1979, I had read a little bit about Fairfax, Virginia's Artful Dodger, but I had yet to hear a note of their music.  That changed when they played a show at Stage East, a rock club located in a shopping center in Syracuse's Eastern suburbs. I was drawn to this rock 'n' roll Mecca of East Syracuse that night in part because The Flashcubes were the opening act, and I tried very hard to see The Flashcubes as often as I could. 

But I was also curious about Artful Dodger, and man, they did not disappoint. I would later look back on that show and describe the group as a cross between Badfinger and The Faces, a comparison somewhat lacking in total accuracy, but which conveyed my impression of Artful Dodger as a power pop group with rock 'n' roll swagger. God, I loved 'em, and their performance of "It's Over" had me absolutely transfixed. And that evening, the price of admission at Stage East included a souvenir: a four-song EP of tracks from Artful Dodger's eponymous debut album. "Wayside." "Think Think." "Follow Me." "It's Over." My Artful Dodger fandom was set to begin in earnest.

THE BEATLES: For No One



The Beatles! I wrote about this wonderful Paul McCartney song in my annotated list of my all-time 25 favorite Beatles songs: This is perhaps the most dignified and simultaneously one of the saddest descriptions of desperation as love slips inexorably through one's hapless, helpless fingers. It would not have sounded out of place on The Beach Boys' masterpiece Pet Sounds. I will add that its lyrics display a depth and maturity that bely the notion that our Paulie was only capable of writing silly love songs.

SUSAN COWSILL: River Of Love


There is a magic point in art, in creation, where our pain becomes redemption, our sorrow turns to strength, our devastating losses flow like a river into our determination to endure. "River Of Love" was written by Barry Cowsill of The Cowsills, and it's a stunning study in heartbreak, in holding on, in letting go, in hoping against hope that what was lost can still be found again. 

Barry Cowsill perished in 2005, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. His sister Susan Cowsill performed the song during the months that he was missing. Its meaning had changed, but its sheer beauty had not.  Susan recorded it for her 2010 album Lighthouse, and its impossible mix of the ache of farewell with the determined buoyancy of pop music makes me want to dance and cry at the same time. We'll meet again. Waiting at the river of love.

FIRST AID KIT: America



My daughter Meghan knew about First Aid Kit well before I did, and she played their Emmylou Harris tribute song "Emmylou" during one of her guest DJ stints on This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio. First Aid Kit were among the final musical guests on Late Night With David Letterman in May of 2015, which was where and when they floored me with their sublime cover of Simon & Garfunkel's "America." 

As a teen, I was a Simon & Garfunkel fan, ranking them up in my pop pantheon not all that far below The Beatles. I never stopped being a fan, though I did listen to them with decreasing frequency. My introduction to the song "America" came via the incongruous means of a comic book letters column in the early '70s, wherein a reader closed his missive about the (then) topically-relevant Green Lantern/Green Arrow series by quoting the song's line, And we walked off to look for America. You can scoff if you wanna, and maybe you should, but that seemingly innocuous tag line has stuck with me for decades. I was 12 or 13. I was on a bus going to or from visiting my grandparents in Missouri. Not knowing the song itself yet, I had no idea how very appropriate it was to learn of its existence while traveling on a Greyhound.

Relevance. We search for it in our entertainment and in our art, a connection to what we feel, to what we desire, to where we think we are and what this place looks like today. Relevance. Meaning. Sometimes we imagine a meaning an artist did not intend, but that's fine. That's how art becomes a part of our lives.

First Aid Kit is from Sweden, consisting of sisters Klara and Johanna Söderberg. In their rendition of "America," First Aid Kit's reading of Paul Simon's lyrics takes on a shimmering, gossamer quality that not even Paul and Artie's delicate harmonies could match. 

Cathy, I'm lost, I said though I knew she was sleeping
And I'm empty and aching and I don't know why

The American experiment is nearly two and a half centuries old. This experiment--a nation governed of the people, by the people, for the people, we the people--is ongoing. It has had successes, and it has had failures. There have been times when we've fallen far short of our goal of who we want to be. There have been times when our collective efforts have shined like a beacon of hope around the world.

I still believe in this experiment. The experiment's guiding principle isn't unique--there are other nations that also embrace these concepts of freedom and possibility--but it is, and must remain, America's defining quality. We can be better than we are. We can always seek to be better than we are. The American experiment can choose acceptance over exclusion, charity over greed, humility over arrogance, love over hate. We can. We will. We must. Our goal is written in our mission statement: a more perfect union. This experiment continues. 

All come to look for America.

Let freedom ring.



THE GO-GO'S: Vacation


It puzzles me that The Go-Go's remain so under-appreciated. They were a fabulous group, they wrote great pop songs, and executed those great pop songs as great pop recordings. Yet many still view them as something, I dunno...frilly, or ephemeral. They deserve a lot better consideration than that. Their debut album Beauty And The Beat is nearly flawless; only the quirky, forgettable "Automatic" prevents me from embracing it as a solid, start-to-finish Love At First Spin record. I loved The Go-Go's then, and I love The Go-Go's still.

Before joining The Go-Go's, bassist Kathy Valentine had been in The Textones, a punk-influenced Texas pop group that also featured future solo performer (and future Gene Clark collaborator) Carla Olsen. Valentine's "Vacation" was one of two songs on the B-side of The Textones' 1980 single "I Can't Fight It." The Textones' original version of "Vacation" shares just enough DNA with the 1982 hit version by The Go-Go's to say that yeah, it's the same song. Sort of. The lyrics are different, the melody is different, and the choppy DIY feel of the original offers little clue to how The Go-Go's could change it into such an irresistible, shining object that cuts with the sharp edges of its wistful regret and unfulfilled wishes. A pop masterpiece, I tell ya, and the title track from the second Go-Go's LP.

DAVID JOHANSEN: Frenchette


As in the case of my first Artful Dodger show, that same summer of '79 also made me a David Johansen fan, when I saw him on a bill with--duh--The Flashcubes. Now--how shall I put this? I was 19, I was with friends at both shows, and we were...well, let's say we were really, really psyched to have a good and transcendent rock 'n' roll time by whatever means necessary. At the Artful Dodger show, I remember grooving on what seemed like an endless, extended opening vamp to "It's Over." With David Jo, I remember "Frenchette" blowin' my freakin' mind, its slow, beguilingly pretty intro giving thunderous way to the forceful boom of its big-Rock battering ram. And its lyrical refrain of Let's just dance! embodied a paradox of triumphant surrender. I can't get the kind of love that I want, so let's just dance and I'll forget. Maybe it was nonsense. Maybe it was deep and meaningful. Maybe it was both. Let's just dance.

THE KENNEDYS: Safe Until Tomorrow


During our current necessary period of social distancing, The Kennedys--expatriate North Syracusan Maura Kennedy and her husband (and honorary Central New Yorker) Pete Kennedy--have been doing one-hour live stream performances from their Greenwich Village apartment every Sunday afternoon at 2:00 Eastern. It's a lovely and uplifting way to spend an hour of your time, and you can join 'em for another virtual show this Sunday. Their original tune "Safe Until Tomorrow" closes their show, and its an appropriate theme song to adopt in this time of trouble.

BEN E. KING: Stand By Me


Ben E. King's classic song "Stand By Me" is one of the 124 fine records scheduled to be featured in my proposed book The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1). Last week, I had an unpleasant dream where my agent sat me down and told me directly that she would not be able to sell the book because my writing just isn't good enough.

Hmmm. I can be self-deprecating and full of genuine doubt about virtually any aspect of what I do or try to do...except my writing. I always believe in my writing.

Maybe the dream was a reflection of the doubt and uncertainty that I sense all around us lately. I'm probably not really as accomplished a writer as I think I am, sure, but my conviction and belief in my ability is my sole practiced arrogance. Because I'm aware that writing is the only thing I've ever been any damned bit of good at doing. The book still may not find a home--that's always a possibility in any attempted commercial endeavor--but I think the work itself is decidedly, like, not terrible.

"Stand By Me" borders on a religious experience, a timeless ode to the power and strength to be derived simply from faith and devotion. Yet it's not a religious song at all; it's a tacit recognition that such a transcendent feeling of renewal and hope can come not just from the heavens, but also from the genuine loyalty of (and loyalty to) a lover or friend. That's the opening paragraph from my book's Ben E. King chapter. As this world continues to give us more and more reason to question what we think we know, to lose faith in what we believe to be unshakeable truth, it's a sentiment worth adopting as both shield and sword. Stand by me.


MARYKATE O'NEIL: I'm Ready For My Luck To Turn Around


Well. Aren't we all?

Stay safe, my friends.


TIP THE BLOGGER: CC's Tip Jar!
You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl airs Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read about our history here.

The many fine This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio compilation albums are still available, each full of that rockin' pop sound you crave. A portion of all sales benefit our perpetually cash-strapped community radio project:

Volume 1: download
Volume 2: CD or download
Volume 3: download
Volume 4: CD or download
Waterloo Sunset--Benefit For This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio:  CD or download

Hey, Carl's writin' a book! The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1) will contain 124 essays about 124 tracks, each one of 'em THE greatest record ever made. An infinite number of records can each be the greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. Updated initial information can be seen here: THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE! (Volume 1).

Monday, March 23, 2020

Fake THIS IS ROCK 'N' ROLL RADIO Playlist: Isolation Edition

This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl is simply too large a concept to be neatly contained within a mere three-hour weekly time slot. Hence these occasional fake TIRnRR playlists, detailing shows we're never really going to do...but could.



We couldn't do a radio show this week. But I wanted to compile a playlist for isolation.

I didn't want it to be literal, to string together a bunch of songs with titles like "Don't Stand So Close To Me" or "U Can't Touch This." I wanted a song cycle to convey the feelings some of us may have in this weird time, to capture the undefined vibe of this emotional mix, the aches of loneliness, anxiety, depression, alienation, doubt, confusion, the heavy weight of dread and uncertainty. I also wanted to look toward the hope of deliverance. I wanted a sense of catharsis for all that we may be going through, a musical security blanket to comfort us as we confront our worry and fear. I wanted some music to make me feel better.

I used love songs. I used break-up songs. I used songs of loss and regret, and I used songs that behold the horizon and swear by all that's holy that there are better days ahead. We'll get there. Let the music play. We'll get there when we can.

Barring pandemics, This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio with Dana & Carl--y'know, the real one--plays Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse on The Spark WSPJ-LP 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read about our history here. TAX DEDUCTIBLE DONATIONS are always welcome.

The many fine This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio compilation albums are still available, each full of that rockin' pop sound you crave. A portion of all sales benefit our perpetually cash-strapped community radio project:

Volume 1: download
Volume 2: CD or download
Volume 3: download
Volume 4: CD or download
Waterloo Sunset--Benefit For This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio:  CD or download

PS: SEND MONEY!!!! We need tech upgrades like Elvis needs boats. Spark Syracuse is supported by listeners like you. Tax-deductible donations are welcome at 
http://sparksyracuse.org/support/

You can follow Carl's daily blog Boppin' (Like The Hip Folks Do) at 
https://carlcafarelli.blogspot.com/

Hey, Carl's writin' a book! The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1) will contain 124 essays about 124 songs, each one of 'em THE greatest record ever made. An infinite number of songs can each be the greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. Updated initial information can be seen here.

FAKE THIS IS ROCK 'N' ROLL RADIO PLAYLIST: Isolation Edition

THE GO-GO'S: Vacation (IRS, Vacation)
THE RAMONES: Don't Come Close (Rhino, Road To Ruin)
PINK FLOYD: Wish You Were Here (Capitol, Wish You Were Here)
THE FLAMIN' GROOVIES: I'll Cry Alone (Grown Up Wrong, Between The Lines)
UTOPIA: Alone (Rhino, Deface The Music)
NEIL DIAMOND: Solitary Man (Columbia, Classics--The Early Years)
--
TALKING HEADS: Life During Wartime (Sire, Fear Of Music)
GARY NUMAN & TUBEWAY ARMY: Are Friends Electric? (Atco, Replicas)
THE KINKS: I'm On An Island (Essential, The Kink Kontroversy)
THE BEACH BOYS: In My Room (Capitol, Surfer Girl)
ROXY MUSIC: Dance Away (Atco, Manifesto)
OTIS REDDING: (Sittin' On) The Dock Of The Bay (Rhino, Otis!)
--
JOAN ARMATRADING: Me Myself I (A & M, Greatest Hits)
GENE PITNEY: I'm Gonna Be Strong (One Way, Anthology)
THE SAINTS: (I'm) Stranded (Triple X, [I'm] Stranded)
GEORGE JONES: You’re Still On My Mind (Mercury, The Best Of George Jones Vol. 1: Hardcore Hony Tonk)
UB40: Red Red Wine (Virgin, Labour Of Love)
THE BYRDS: Here Without You (Columbia, Mr. Tambourine Man)

BILL LLOYD: The World Is A Different Place Without You (New Boss Sounds, Back To Even)
THE MONKEES: Me & Magdalena (Rhino, Good Times!)
MR. ENCRYPTO: The Last Time [a cappella) (unreleased mix)
ROY ORBISON: Only The Lonely (Orbison, The Very Best Of Roy Orbison)
THE MUFFS: On My Own (Omnivore, No Holiday)
ANNY CELSI: Sideways Rain (Ragazza, Kaleidoscope Heart: 12 Golden Hits)
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THE VERTEBRATS: Left In The Dark (Parasol, A Thousand Day Dream)
DAVID JOHANSEN: Frenchette (Razor & Tie, David Johansen)
THE BEATLES: For No One (Apple, Revolver)
THE BEE GEES: I Can't See Nobody (Polydor, Bee Gees' 1st)
THE SMITHEREENS: Cigarette (Capitol, Especially For You)
THE SPINNERS: My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me) (Motown, The Best Of The Spinners)
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THE HOLLIES: So Lonely (EMI, Clarke, Hicks & Nash Years)
ARTFUL DODGER: It's Over (Real Gone Music, The Complete Columbia Recordings)
POP CO-OP: You Don’t Love Me Anymore (Kool Kat Musik, VA: This Is Rock 'n' Roll Radio, Volume 4)
TRANSLATOR: Everywhere That I’m Not (Columbia, Everywhere That We Were)
NAZARETH: Love Hurts (A & M, Classics Volume 16)
TOM PETTY & THE HEARTBREAKERS: Refugee (MCA, Anthology)

MARYKATE O'NEIL: I'm Ready For My Luck To Turn Around (71, 1 800-Bankrupt)
THE FOUR TOPS: Reach Out I'll Be There (Motown, The Ultimate Collection)
PAUL McCARTNEY: Hope Of Deliverance (Capitol, Off The Ground)
SUSAN COWSILL: River Of Love (Threadhead, Lighthouse)
20/20: Song Of The Universe (Big Deal, VA: Yellow Pills Vol. 1)
THE KENNEDYS: Safe Until Tomorrow (The Kennedys, Safe Until Tomorrow)

FIRST AID KIT: America (Columbia, America)
JOHNNY NASH: I Can See Clearly Now (Epic, single)
THE WHO: Won't Get Fooled Again (MCA, Who's Next)
BIG STAR: The Ballad Of El Goodo (Ardent, # 1 Record/Radio City)
SLY AND THE FAMILY STONE: Everybody Is A Star (Epic, Greatest Hits)
SIMPLE MINDS: Don't You (Forget About Me) (Virgin, Glittering Prize 81/92)
THE JACKSON FIVE: I'll Be There (Motown, Greatest Hits)
THE BARRACUDAS: Somewhere Outside (Voxx, Drop Out With The Barracudas)
THE PANDORAS: It’s About Time (Voxx, It's About Time)
BEN E. KING: Stand By Me (Rhino, Stand By Me)
THE SHADOWS: Wonderful Land (Scamp, Shadows Are Go!)